Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Professor Christopher Robbins of the State University of New York at Purchase explains how viewing problems from within the context of a different culture can bring about novel solutions. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Six former or current students at Great Neck North High School, in New York, were arrested Tuesday based on allegations that they paid between $1,500 and $2,500 for another student to take the SAT for them, the Associated Press reported. The student charged with taking the SAT for others faces charges of scheming to defraud and criminal impersonation.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Five major technology companies have agreed to a series of investments in facilities and research in New York State, in a deal that will bring billions of dollars and hundreds of jobs to the state -- with big gains for the State University of New York. Governor Andrew M. Cuomo announced the deal Tuesday and said that the state will spend $400 million over the next five years in the SUNY College for Nanoscale and Science Engineering, in Albany. That college is expected to see significant job growth, as is the SUNY Institute of Technology, in Utica.

Wednesday, September 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Jack Conway, Kentucky's attorney general, on Tuesday filed a consumer protection lawsuit against National College of Kentucky, Inc., a for-profit, for allegedly misrepresenting job placement numbers. Conway is leading a 22-state investigation of potential abuses among for-profits. He has also sued Daymar College for allegedly misleading students about their textbooks and financial aid and joined a whistle-blower complaint against Education Management Corporation over allegations of illegal payments to student recruiters, and he is investigating five other for-profits operating in Kentucky. The suit against National claims the college publicly displayed "significantly higher" job placement rates than the rates it reported to an accrediting agency. National has attempted to block the investigation, and has appealed a judge's ruling that it could continue.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

While many colleges won't sell alcoholic energy drinks, the University of New Hampshire is considering a ban on non-alcoholic energy drinks such as Full Throttle and Red Bull, the Associated Press reported. In fact, the university announced a ban on the sale of such products Monday, but backtracked later in the day and said it would study the idea further before imposing a ban. (This updates an earlier version of this item, based on the reported ban.) "The University of New Hampshire is committed to making its campus the healthiest in the country," Rick MacDonald, assistant director of dining at the university, said when explaining the idea behind the ban.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

The Delegate Assembly of the United University Professions, the faculty union of the State University of New York, has adopted a package of measures designed to promote the interests of non-tenure-track faculty members. The UUP, affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers and the American Association of University Professors, pledged to adopt a system in which adjuncts who go on and off payroll can remain members of the union. Further, each campus chapter will have an officer focused on contingent issues, and at least one spot on the statewide union's executive board will be held by someone off the tenure track.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Jane Sanders resigned Monday as president of Burlington College, citing unspecified differences with the college's board, The Burlington Free Press reported. Speculation about her departure has been rampant since the disclosure of a board agenda with an item labeled "removal of the president."

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, John Anderson of Rice University explains what the sediment below the ice of Antarctica reveals about the continent’s past and the planet’s future. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Almost half of undergraduate programs at public colleges and universities in Texas are in danger of being eliminated because they do not meet a new state requirement of graduating at least 25 students every five years, UPI reported. Many physics programs nationally do not graduate large numbers of undergraduates, but are considered vital nonetheless because of the role of the discipline in preparing students for a variety of science and engineering related fields, and because of the significance of research in physics. A delegation from the American Physical Society recently met with officials of the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board to discuss concerns about enforcing the rule with regard to physics. Raymund Paredes, the Texas commissioner of higher education, said he would not back exceptions to the rule. "In this budgetary environment, we can't afford the luxury of programs not producing graduates," he told UPI. "It's up to academic departments faced with closure of programs to salvage them."

Tuesday, September 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Spain on Monday opened its first and Europe's second university focused on the culinary arts, AFP reported. For its first year, 74 students were admitted to a four-year program, out of 380 who applied.

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