Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, January 16, 2012 - 3:00am

A South Carolina jury has awarded $1 million to two boys who were forced to play a "choking game" while at a Clemson University summer camp in 2008, The Post and Courier reported. The lawsuit charged that Clemson should not have let the counselor have access to the boys without a background check that would have turned up red flags. A university spokeswoman said that an appeal is planned because "we believe the award is excessive" and "is not supported by the facts in the case."

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 3:00am

California leads the nation in unaccredited colleges, The New York Times reported. Nearly 1,000 unaccredited or "questionably accredited" institutions operate in the state, frequently ignoring state regulations. "There are a lot of schools that beg the question 'What exactly is going on in California?' " Eyal Ben Cohen, managing director of Accredibase Limited, a company based in London that monitors diploma mills, told the Times. "California has very weak oversight procedures as far as allowing an institution to operate within its borders. An institution within California can obtain a license very easily."

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 4:08am

Washington and Lee University will hold classes today, over the objections of students who wanted classes called off to observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day, The Washington Post reported. Colleges' practices on calling off classes for the holiday vary. While some colleges observe the day without classes, many colleges hold classes on most federal holidays, not wanting to have fewer sessions held on Mondays than on other days. And many colleges have long January breaks, so that classes wouldn't be held today in any case. At Washington and Lee, the issue is complicated by the university's observance (later this week) of Founders' Day on the birthday of Robert E. Lee, one of those for whom the university is named. On that day, students have a shorter class schedule so that they can attend a convocation. A university spokesman said that the university honors King's memory with programs that show respect for the late civil rights leader's legacy. "We believe that canceling classes is not the only way, or even necessarily the most meaningful way, to demonstrate that respect," the spokesman said.

 

Monday, January 16, 2012 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Rebecca Murphy of Johns Hopkins University reveals how decades of pollution control efforts are paying off for the Chesapeake Bay. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, William Poulin-Deltour of Middlebury College explains how divergent cultural roots created different ideas of community in the United States and France. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 3:00am

The Canadian Association of University Teachers (the national faculty union in Canada) on Thursday criticized the government for naming Shirley Tilghman, Princeton University's president, as co-chair of the Canada Excellence Research Chairs (CERC) program selection board. The research chairs program has provided funds for Canadian research universities to recruit top professors from all over the world, and Canadian academics have closely watched the work of the panel that has picked winners. The statement from James L. Turk, executive director of the faculty group, did not name Tilghman, and he stressed that the group had no fault with her -- only with her serving while being president of an American university. "We were surprised and disappointed at the announcement today that no Canadian university president or other academic was deemed distinguished enough to be named co-chair," Turk said in the statement. "There is no shortage of Canadian university presidents and other distinguished academics at Canadian universities who could more appropriately have filled the role."

Canadian officials praised Tilghman for agreeing to serve on the panel, noting that she was raised in Winnipeg. A Princeton official confirmed that she remains a Canadian citizen. It appears that Princeton may have a fondness for Canadian leaders. Tilghman has been president since 2001. She succeeded Harold T. Shapiro, a Montreal native with dual Canadian and American citizenship.

 

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 3:00am

Liberty University has just sold $100 million in bonds, bringing its total debt to $228 million, to finance expansion, Bloomberg reported. The Christian university has $225 million in projects planned in the next five years, including a library, a baseball stadium and a school of health sciences.

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 3:00am

Behavioral and social sciences play a key role in health issues and need to play a key role in the medical school curriculum, according to a report released Thursday by the Association of American Medical Colleges. The report notes that behaviors and the social determinants of health -- such as smoking, diet, exercise, and socioeconomic status -- account for more than 50 percent of premature disease and death in the United States.

 

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 4:40am

Central Michigan University's faculty formally approved a three-year contract extension Thursday, the university announced, ending a long labor dispute that included a strike and a judge's order to return to work.

Friday, January 13, 2012 - 4:52am

Viruses on computers at City College of San Francisco have sent personal banking and other information from thousands of faculty members, administrators and others to hackers with ties to Russian and Chinese criminal networks for as long as a decade, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Campus officials identified the breaches weeks ago and are working to eliminate them. No cases of identity theft have been cited yet, though, the newspaper reported.

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