Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 10, 2013

Nearly 100 graduate assistants at the University of Florida were not paid on time on Friday, The Gainesville Sun reported. Administrators blamed the problems on issues associated with the start of the academic year and promised that emergency checks would soon be provided to the students. But grad student leaders said that the university could have avoided the problem and wasn't moving quickly enough to help the students.

 

September 10, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Stefan Lüpold of Syracuse University explain how females of certain species can pick the father of their offspring after mating with multiple males. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

September 10, 2013

A report released today by Universities UK attempts to answer the question of where student fees are going, chronicling investments in financial aid, infrastructure, teaching, student services and career placement. The funding model for England’s universities has shifted drastically in recent years; public funding has fallen and been replaced by tuition fees, which were first introduced in 1997 and are now capped at £9,000 (about $14,150) for domestic students. Under the new funding regime, some universities have seen net reductions in their income and others net increases.  

September 10, 2013

Declines in the total enrollment of American higher education are "credit negative" for colleges and universities, particularly the majority that depend on tuition revenue for operating support, says a review of credit issues released Monday by Moody's Investors Services. "Enrollment declines in higher education are credit negative because they heighten competitive pressure for all universities. This limits opportunity to grow tuition revenue, now the primary revenue for the majority of public and private universities," said the report. "[A]mong traditional undergraduate colleges and universities, the credit effect is more severe for lower-rated, tuition-dependent colleges and universities that lack a strong brand name or market position. For higher rated universities with established student demand, the effect is minimal."

The report added that demographics of students may have a major impact on which institutions feel these shifts. "With the fall 2012 enrollment declines most pronounced for students over the age of 25, the credit effect is most acute for community colleges and for the 30 percent of universities we rate where more than 25 percent of total enrollment is at the graduate level," the report said. "Declining graduate enrollment can disproportionately affect a university since students in graduate programs typically generate more revenue per student than in undergraduate programs."

September 10, 2013

More than 1,000 impermissible phone calls and other inappropriate contact by officials across Iowa State University’s 18-team athletics program, used to reach nearly 400 recruits, led the National Collegiate Athletic Association to cite the institution for its "failure to monitor" the athletics program Friday. Penalties include limited telephone contact with prospects and a reduction in the number of recruiting opportunities for several sports. Coaches and staff members failed to audit or adequately keep track of the number of phone calls made and text messages sent to prospects, the NCAA public infractions report says, with many coaches claiming that the university’s compliance office never told them to log calls. While 1,400 impermissible calls were placed across all programs, one former student men’s basketball coach sent 160 impermissible text messages to prospects.

Besides several recruiting restrictions, the sanctions include public reprimand and censure and two years’ probation. However, because the penalties were mostly self-imposed by the university several years ago, long before the case’s summary disposition (which does not include a formal hearing) wrapped up Friday, many of the recruiting restrictions have already expired.

September 10, 2013

The University of Denver went ahead Monday night with its plans to honor President George W. Bush, as a protest went ahead outside the event, The Denver Post reported. Bush appeared at a fund-raising event (closed to the press) for the university's Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Anger over the award first surfaced this summer, when word spread that the university was going to honor Bush for "improving the human condition." The university then announced that it would change the award so that it would honor the former president's "global service." That change did not satisfy those who picketed outside the event. They held signs saying things such as "No Awards for War Criminals" and "The Iraq War Is Not a Global Service."

 

September 9, 2013

The Harvard Business School has undertaken one of the most ambitious efforts ever to promote gender equity in business education, with mixed results, according to an in-depth report in The New York Times. The article describes a wide range of efforts, including coaching for female professors and students, and campaigns against social traditions that may have placed women at a disadvantage. Many women say that the efforts have been overdue, and applaud the efforts. But others see a degree of social engineering that they find inappropriate for graduate education.

 

September 9, 2013

The University of British Columbia is the second Canadian university in a week to be investigating the use of a chant seen as encouraging rape and underage sex, CTV News reported. Last week, officials at Saint Mary's University, in Halifax, responded with outrage to a sexist chant on video, with orientation leaders involved. Now, UBC is investigating with a similar chant is used during orientation at its business school. The chant: “Y-O-U-N-G at UBC we like ‘em young, Y is for your sister, O is for oh so tight, U is for under age, N is for no consent, G is for go to jail."

September 9, 2013

Athletes are protesting a shift in Lafayette College's policy about students who need medical help because of alcohol consumption, The Morning Call reported. Like many colleges, Lafayette has a "Good Samaritan" policy that assures students that they will not be punished for underage drinking when they seek medical attention for themselves or others. So far this academic year, athletes have made up half of those needing medical attention due to binge drinking, and athletics officials said that they were going to start punishing such athletes, with suspensions from competition.

Some athletes are predicting that the new policy will discourage students from seeking help, potentially endangering them. But Bruce McCutcheon, the athletics director, defended the new policy. "It is a privilege to wear Lafayette on your chest. If you choose behaviors that are not responsible, you need to be prepared for the consequences," he said.

September 9, 2013

The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools has lifted the sanction of "on notice" from Ashford University, according to a corporate filing from Bridgepoint Education, the for-profit university's holding company. The commission had been concerned that Ashford would not meet its new standards for accreditation, including a requirement for colleges to have a "substantial presence" in the regional accreditor's geographical domain. But the university apparently resolved those issues. In a related action, Ashford's biggest accreditation victory this year has been to successfully transfer its status to the Western Association of Colleges and Schools, a move that took two tries.

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