Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

January 13, 2014

Most universities lose money on research, according to an analysis published in the journal Technology and Innovation - Proceedings of the National Academy of Inventors. The study notes that universities seek (and receive) research grants from the federal government and other sources. But the study says that these grants cover such a small share of "indirect costs" of research -- such as staffing, equipment and facilities -- that typically institutions lose money. The authors of the paper are Karen Holbrook, former president of Ohio State University, and Paul R. Sanberg, senior vice president for research and innovation at the University of South Florida.

January 13, 2014

The University of Colorado at Denver does not plan to seek the dismissal of an administrator who was placed on leave after the revelation that she was running a phone sex service, CBS Denver 4 reported. The TV network has also found that she ran an escort service. The administrator -- Resa Cooper-Morning, cultural diversity coordinator in the university's ethnic studies department -- has declined to comment, and her lawyer has denied any wrongdoing.

A spokesman for the university said: "We’ve been unable to establish that Ms. Cooper-Morning engaged in criminal activity nor have we been able to determine that she operated her outside businesses while on the job. The university does not condone Ms. Cooper-Morning's activities, but under the law, there are limits on actions that employers can take regarding off-duty conduct of employees. In the absence of additional information, Ms. Cooper-Morning remains employed by the university."

January 13, 2014

Pennsylvania State University earned more ($2.7 million) on credit card royalties and fees than did any other college or university, according to an analysis by The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. The newspaper used reports required by a new federal law. But the analysis also found that the number of accounts on which Penn State is paid is going down -- from 65,955 in December 2011 to 60,490 in December 2012.

January 13, 2014

The University of Southern California is today announcing a $50 million gift to create a center for "convergent bioscience." The center will be a collaborative effort of USC's arts and sciences and engineering colleges.

 

January 13, 2014

Robby Burleigh, a professor at Baton Rouge Community College, has been arrested on charges that he attacked his fiancée, who also is one of his students, The Times-Picayune of New Orleans reported. Police records state that the fiancée is pregnant and that a fight started over her desire to keep the baby. Burleigh teaches philosophy of religion, biomedical ethics, introduction to ethics and introduction to logic at the college. He faces charges of domestic abuse battery, false imprisonment and simple criminal damage to property. He told authorities that he did pin down his fiancée, but only to try to "calm her down."

 

January 13, 2014

Seven fraternity members at the State University of New York at Canton have been charged by authorities with hazing, and The Watertown Daily News detailed some of the acts they are alleged to have orchestrated in November's pledging process:

  • Pledges were branded with a metal hanger, with the branding done by the father of a fraternity member.
  • Removing excrement from a toilet by hand and being told to eat it. (The pledge who reported this said he declined to actually eat.)
  • Rubbing hot sauce onto their crotches for 15 minutes.
  • Cracking raw eggs into the mouth of a pledge, who would then be told to spit the egg into another pledge's mouth.

The students who were charged will appear in court later this month to respond to the charges.

January 10, 2014

The U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights is investigating a federal complaint alleging that Lehigh University failed to respond to race-related harassment on campus, the institution confirmed Thursday. The complaint, first reported by The Morning Call, was filed by a 1977 Lehigh graduate who says the university did not report vandalism of a multi-cultural residence hall as a hate crime. Instead, the complaint says, officials classified the November 2013 incident in which the house was allegedly egged and spray-painted with racial slurs as criminal mischief, which is not required to be reported under the Clery Act.

Lehigh said in a statement that it will “fully cooperate” with the investigation, “and will work with OCR to achieve our goal of making Lehigh a more diverse and inclusive community. Lehigh has a long-standing commitment to diversity and inclusion and, with strong engagement by students, faculty, staff and the administration, has accelerated our efforts with a number of initiatives underway.”

January 10, 2014

A federal study tracking a cohort of high school sophomores over 10 years shows that about half had a postsecondary credential, that those who went straight to college after high school were far likelier to earn a degree, and that the bachelor's degree holders among them were less likely to be unemployed or to have lost a job since 2006.

The report, published by the National Center for Education Statistics and drawn from the Education Longitudinal Study of 2002, examines a range of employment and other outcomes a decade later for students who were high school sophomores that year. Among the findings:

  • A third (33 percent) of the 2002 high school sophomores had earned a bachelor's degree or higher, another 9 percent had associate degrees, 10 percent had undergraduate-level certificates, and 32 percent had attended college but lacked a credential. Forty-two percent of fhose who went to college within three months of completing high school had earned a bachelor's degree, and 11 percent had earned a master's.
  • Of those who went to college, 40 percent had no student loan debt, 36 percent had borrowed less than $25,000, and 11 percent had more than $50,000 in student loans.
  • Those with some kind of postsecondary credential were less likely to be unemployed (11.8 percent, vs. 25.9 percent of those who did not complete high school and 15 percent who had only a high school diploma), and to have received public assistance (26.2 percent, vs. 47.2 and 32.4 percent, respectively).
January 10, 2014

The University of Wisconsin System has a new president -- and like his two most recent predecessors, he was an internal candidate. The system's Board of Regents on Thursday selected Raymond W. Cross, chancellor of the University of Wisconsin Colleges and University of Wisconsin-Extension, as the system's new leader. Cross, who has been in Wisconsin since 2011, replaces Kevin C. Reilly, who resigned to take a leadership position at the American Council on Education after months of rocky relations with legislators over the system's finances.

Reilly had the same job -- as chancellor of the system's network of two-year colleges, online programs and community services -- before he became UW's president. His predecessor, Katherine C. Lyall, was the system's chief academic officer before she became president.

January 10, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Minna Huotilainen of the University of Helsinki explains why it may never be too early to introduce a baby to music. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

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