Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00am

The faculty union of the University of Rhode Island has filed an unfair labor practice charge after the state's Board of Governors for Higher Education rejected a three-year contract that had been negotiated with the union, The Providence Journal reported. The board also rejected contracts for other public colleges, and for graduate students at the university. Board members said that they didn't have enough information on the financial implications of the contracts. A statement from the American Association of University Professors, which represents the faculty members and grad students at the university, blasted the move, saying that "board negotiators represented to us that they were authorized to reach agreement with us."

Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00am

A bill to keep the interest rate on subsidized student loans at 3.4 percent for another year failed to pass a key procedural hurdle in the Senate on Tuesday, setting up more conflict over how to stop the interest rate from doubling July 1. Democrats and Republicans have agreed on the need to keep the interest rate at its current, historic low for at least another year, but can't find common ground on how to pay for the extension. House Republicans passed a bill last week to take the needed $6 billion from a preventive care fund in the health care reform law, while Senate Democrats support changing tax laws to require high-earning stockholders in certain types of corporations to contribute to payroll taxes.

The Senate voted 52-45 in favor of allowing debate on the bill, but failed to reach the 60 votes needed to defeat a filibuster.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Shaun Green, men's soccer coach at Central Connecticut State University, is facing criticism after he acknowledged taking stacks of the student newspaper and throwing them in the trash, the Associated Press reported. He was upset over an article about his team's inability to meet academic requirements to participate in next season's National Collegiate Athletic Association tournament.


Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Northeastern University on Tuesday officially unveiled plans to open a Seattle graduate campus in September. The Boston-based university last year launched a graduate campus in Charlotte, N.C., and plans to start other campuses in Austin, Minneapolis and Silicon Valley. The Seattle branch will feature 16 degree programs, including cybersecurity and engineering, which will be geared to the city's technology sector. Tayloe Washburn, a local business leader, will be the campus's dean and executive officer.

Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 4:26am

A panel of the California State University Board of Trustees has endorsed a plan that it hopes will halt intense criticism of the board's moves to increase pay for campus presidents at a time of deep budget cuts. The plan would freeze state-funded pay for campus presidents, but allow foundations to provide new presidents with additional pay up to 10 percent more than that received by their predecessors, The Los Angeles Times reported. So far, critics aren't dropping their concerns. "They are trying to run it like a for-profit business, but we're a public university, so it's the citizens that are really paying," said Liz Cara, a professor of occupational therapy at San Jose State University.


Wednesday, May 9, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Daniel Ladik of Seton Hall University reveals why some consumers struggle with the same purchasing decision over and over again. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The University of Pittsburgh is joining the ranks of public universities responding to budget constraints by restructuring how it administers its campuses. The university announced Monday that it would have two of its (five) regional campuses report to a single president, and centralize numerous administrative functions for the campuses. Under the arrangement, the president of Pitt's Bradford campus, Livingston Alexander, will oversee the university's Titusville campus as well, with Titusville's current provost becoming a campus dean (responsible for day-to-day oversight) and reporting to Alexander. The announcement did not estimate how much the realignment might save.

The University System of Georgia is proceeding with a plan to merge several sets of campuses, and the State University of New York System has pushed (with mixed success) to consolidate the leadership over pairs of its campuses as well.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012 - 3:00am

The Evansville Courier & Press reported that a highlight of this year's University of Evansville commencement was a line from President Thomas A. Kazee -- and the line seemed to be most popular in the sections for attendees who are family members of graduates. He won applause for telling students: "Move away from home and get a job as soon as possible. Your parents love you, but enough is enough."

Tuesday, May 8, 2012 - 4:32am

Eastern Michigan University is apologizing after sending an expulsion notice intended for about 100 students to many more who were not in fact being expelled, the Associated Press reported. The university isn't sure how many people received the notice, but the group includes some recent graduates.

Tuesday, May 8, 2012 - 3:00am

Ohio State University has spent more than $800,000 on President Gordon Gee's travel expenses since 2007, including more than $550,000 in the last two years, The Dayton Daily News reported. Ohio State officials noted the value of Gee's travel, in reaching donors and others, and in spreading the word about Ohio State across the world. But the newspaper noted that Gee's travel expenses exceeded not only those of two Ohio governors, but also of the presidents of other big public universities with global ambitions and intense fund-raising efforts -- the Universities of Michigan, North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Virginia.



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