Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Michigan has agreed to pay Andrei Borisov, a former non-tenured faculty member in pediatrics, $550,000, and to remove certain negative statements from his personnel file, to settle his suit against the university, AnnArbor.com reported. Borisov had resigned in 2008, after being told that his behavior was seen as threatening, following inquiries he had been making into possible plagiarism in reports to federal agencies that made grants to Michigan. The university denied wrongdoing in those cases.

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 3:00am

California's public higher education systems have agreed to drop opposition to a state bill that will require much more disclosure of records about their foundations and auxiliary operations. However, the colleges and universities have been assured of provisions that will preserve in most cases the right of donors to be anonymous. With the agreement, the bill is expected to be enacted.

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute's Pauline Oliveros examines the difference between passive hearing and active listening. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 3:00am

A state judge has ordered the University of Virginia to release documents produced by Michael Mann, who formerly taught there, to a conservative foundation requesting them as open records, The Washington Examiner reported. Mann is a climate researcher whose work is consistent with the scientific consensus on climate change, but who is doubted by some conservatives. In an e-mail, Mann said: "I think it's very unfortunate that fossil fuel industry-funded climate change deniers ... continue to harass U.Va., NASA, and other leading academic and scientific institutions with these frivolous attacks."

Thursday, May 26, 2011 - 3:00am

  • Judy A. Beal, interim dean of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences at Simmons College, has been named to the job on a permanent basis.
  • Beth Halloran, assistant vice president for development at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, has been appointed as vice president for development and alumni relations at Grinnell College.
  • Ronald S. Harichandran, chair of the department of civil and environmental engineering at Michigan State University, has been selected as dean of the Tagliatela College of Engineering at the University of New Haven, in Connecticut.
  • Onye Ozuzu, associate chair and director of dance in the department of theatre and dance at the University of Colorado at Boulder, has been named chair of the dance department at Columbia College Chicago.
  • Carol Rozansky, professor of education at the University of Nebraska at Omaha, has been chosen as chair of the education department at Columbia College Chicago.
  • Darrell P. Wheeler, associate dean for research and community partnerships at Hunter College of the the City University of New York, has been selected as dean of the School of Social Work at Loyola University Chicago.
  • The appointments are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also include a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:00am

    The board of the University of Vermont has ended the official volunteer role of Rachel Kahn-Fogel, wife of President Daniel Fogel, in fund-raising and other events, The Burlington Free Press reported. The move came amid an investigation into Kahn-Fogel's apparent pursuit of a personal relationship with a senior administrator at the university, Michael Schultz, associate vice president of development and alumni relations. Kahn-Fogel's interest in Schultz became known when Schultz's wife -- who is currently in divorce proceedings with him -- found unopened letters from Kahn-Fogel to Schultz. He acknowledged in the divorce proceedings that he had secured a post office box to receive the letters privately. Fogel released a statement in which he said that he supported the inquiry, and revealing (with his wife's permission) that "she has long been in treatment for serious mental health issues with which she has struggled throughout her life."

    Schultz wrote his doctoral dissertation on issues related to the spouses of colleges and university presidents; Inside Higher Ed has quoted him about the subject and published an essay in which he offered advice to presidential spouses. One of his points: "A good reputation is hard to earn but easy to lose."

    Fogel announced in March that he would step down as president next year, after 10 years in office.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:00am

    Students who arrived at Alpine College, a for-profit college in Washington State, were stunned Monday to find the institution shut down, The Spokesman-Review reported. Many of the students had just started courses, and paid tuition. The owner and the vice president did not respond to requests for comment, but a statement from the college cited financial problems and the poor health of one of the owners. One owner was barred in 2007 from working as a certified public accountant for two years. And a former executive director is facing charges of theft of college funds to make $45,000 in personal purchases, the newspaper said.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:00am

    It would probably be a cheap joke to call it a mixed marriage -- but the Touro College and University System is announcing today that it is taking over control of New York Medical College from the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York. Touro, which describes itself as "America’s largest, not-for-profit, independent institution of higher and professional education under Jewish auspices," will add the private health sciences institution in Westchester County, N.Y., to its mix of osteopathic medicine and pharmacy colleges. New York Medical College operates a medical school, a graduate school in basic medical sciences, and a School of Health Sciences and Practice. The institutions announced 18 months ago that they would affiliate; under the arrangement to be announced today, Touro will appoint a new board to operate New York Medical College.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:00am

    Colleges in and around Joplin, Mo., were not among the sites hardest hit by this week's devastating tornadoes, but are playing a role in recovery efforts, raising money, operating as relief centers -- and also trying to verify the safety of their students and employees. An article in The Springfield News-Leader reviewed the efforts. These web pages describe efforts at Crowder College and Missouri Southern State University.

    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 - 3:00am

    The Thiel Foundation is today announcing its inaugural class of fellows in an unusual program: $100,000 and mentorship for two years as long as the talented recipients agree to stay out of college. More than 400 people applied, and 24 fellowships are being awarded. The idea behind the program is that talented young entrepreneurs should set out to create businesses without waiting for formal education credentials.

    Pages

    Search for Jobs

    Back to Top