Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

January 30, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Jose Antonio Mazzotti of Tufts University reveals how the indigenous population of Peru responded to the Spanish conquest of the Andes. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

January 30, 2013

With a vote by the House of Delegates Tuesday, both houses of the Virginia General Assembly have now confirmed Helen Dragas for another term on the University of Virginia board, The Richmond Times-Dispatch reported. Dragas was the leader of an effort last year to oust Teresa Sullivan as president (an effort that briefly appeared to succeed). Many critics of the board's handling of the situation last year hoped legislators would block the re-appointment of Dragas. While some lawmakers opposed the move, the final vote to confirm -- 63 to 33 -- wasn't close.

 

January 30, 2013

Boston College has asked a federal appeals court to reverse a court order that the college turn over some oral history records to British authorities, the Associated Press reported. Many historians have opposed release of the records, saying that violating the terms under which people gave oral history interviews would discourage others from talking to researchers. (Many oral history interviews are given on the condition that they remain sealed for specified periods of time.) The British have said that they needed to records to pursue possible criminal charges against those involved with violence in Northern Ireland. Last week, however, Dolours Price -- the apparent target of the criminal investigation and one of those who were interviewed for the Boston College collection -- died. Boston College now says that since there can be no legal charge brought against her, there is no reason to force release of the papers.

 

January 30, 2013

Could the National Football League offer a model for reforming college admissions? A paper being released today by the Center for American Progress argues that it could. The NFL "establishes rules that temper competitive practices that could harm the game of football," says the paper, by Jerome A. Lucido, executive director of the Center for Enrollment Research, Policy and Practice at the University of Southern California. Lucido argues that just as the NFL bans steroids, college admissions (with institutions acting collectively) could ban "hyped facts and figures." Every college could be required to report information such as the extent to which the college considers family ability to pay in admissions decisions, how close to full need colleges' aid packages are, policies that govern the renewal of aid awards, and the admission rates for students with various credentials. And just as the NFL engages in revenue-sharing, colleges could (possibly with some relief from antitrust monitors) work together to increase need-based aid, and agree on common terms so families could better understand the true "price" of a college education.

 

January 30, 2013

WASHINGTON —  A panel discussion at the Council for Higher Education Accreditation's annual conference here Tuesday highlighted differences between Senate Democrats and House Republicans as the deadline for reauthorizing the Higher Education Act looms at the end of the year. While many don't expect the reauthorization will be done on time, and perhaps will not be finished during this Congress, the panel highlighted a key divide between the parties: House Republicans, represented on the panel by Amy Jones, education policy counsel to the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, favor some consumer disclosures from colleges but fewer mandates and regulations. Senate Democrats, represented by Spiros Protopsaltis, senior education policy adviser to the Senate committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions, are seeking metrics to judge college's value. They emphasized to accreditors that many on Capitol Hill don't understand accreditation or understand its value — a key concern since reauthorization is expected to touch on accreditation and related issues.

January 30, 2013

A federal judge this week dismissed a lawsuit charging that Kaplan Higher Education discriminated against black job applicants by rejecting some people seeking employment because of their credit histories, The New York Times reported. The suit, brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, said that relying on credit histories has a disproportionate impact on black applicants. The suit was dismissed after the judge agreed to block testimony from an expert witness for the EEOC, finding that the way that witness identified which job applicants were black was not reliable.

 

January 29, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Peter McGraw of the University of Colorado at Boulder explores what makes jokes about tragic events too soon. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

January 29, 2013

College and university fund-raisers predict that giving to their institutions grew by an average of 5.5 percent in 2012, according to a twice-annual survey by the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. If that prediction holds true, giving for 2012 would be higher than the $31.6 billion record high for the 2007-8 academic year. Fund-raisers also predict giving to grow by 5.8 percent in 2013, a rate equal to the average over the past 20 years.

January 29, 2013

The new chancellor of California's community colleges, Brice W. Harris, has written in opposition to a legal challenge to the system's shared governance structure. California Competes, a nonprofit group led by Robert Shireman, says local academic senates have illegal veto power over board actions, which contributes to a "tangled bureaucracy." Harris, however, said the shared governance regulations are lawful and good public policy. And while he said the group's intentions are well-meaning, they are "seriously flawed."

January 29, 2013

The Board of Trustees at Cedarville University, a Baptist college in Ohio recently shaken by intradenominational arguments and the resignation of two administrators, voted Friday to cut the college's philosophy major and to approve the unexplained resignation of its vice president for student life. The college said the major needed to be cut due to low student interest, and that a philosophy minor will remain an option; students and alumni argued that eliminating the major damages the college's credibility as a liberal arts institution.

“The last few weeks have been difficult for our university family,” the college's acting president, John Gredy, said in a statement announcing the change. “Please join me in praying that God will bring healing to our brokenness, peace to our hearts and unity to our community.” 

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