Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

March 13, 2013

More than 100 protesters marched to the Higher Education Ministry in Sri Lanka on Tuesday calling for an increase in the number of public universities, Xinhua reportedThe news service reported that more than 144,000 students pass the university entrance each year, but there are only spots for 22,000.

March 13, 2013

The cost of tuition and living for international students in Australia has increased 166 percent since 2002, The Australian reportedAn analysis by the Boston Consulting Group estimates total annual costs for the average international student in Australia as being $44,000, compared to $37,000 for international students in the U.S. and $30,000 for those studying in England. The article cites exchange rates as one critical factor in the increase.

March 13, 2013

A Mississippi man has been charged with two counts of felony cyberstalking over threats posted on Facebook against Carolyn Meyers, the president of Jackson State University, The Clarion Ledger reported. The man, currently held in jail, is not a student at the university.

March 12, 2013

University College London is investigating reports that an event organized by the Islamic Education and Research Academy segregated the audience by gender, The Guardian reported. Students reported being told that women had to sit in the back, while spaces were provided up front for men, or for male-female couples.

March 12, 2013

Northwestern University announced Monday that it would cut the size of its entering class by 10 percent, while also adding 25 percent to spending on financial aid. While several other law schools have made such moves, amid declines in law school applications and a tough job market for graduates, Northwestern is among the more highly regarded law schools to announce such a shift. “We can’t ignore the destabilizing forces that the legal industry is facing today,” said Daniel Rodriguez, the law dean, in a statement.

 

March 12, 2013

Pennsylvania State University on Monday revealed details on the cost of the outside investigation it commissioned into the Jerry Sandusky scandal, including the cost ($8.1 million) paid to the law firm that produced what is known as the Freeh Report, The Centre Daily Times reported. Those expenses bring the total expenses to date for the scandal to $41 million.

 

March 12, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Rebecca Knickmeyer of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill explains how an infant’s brain can display signs of future neurological disorders. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


 

March 12, 2013

Faculty members at Arcadia University were told Monday night that President Carl Oxholm III has left the position, after less than two years in office, The Philadelphia Daily News reported. An e-mail sent to professors gave no reason for the sudden departure. Several students said on Twitter that they were disappointed with the news.

March 12, 2013

Emory University confirmed reports Monday that when a dining hall is redesigned, Chick-fil-A will no longer be part of the facility. Some students at Emory, citing the anti-gay statements and political contributions of its CEO, have been pushing for Chick-fil-A's removal. And nationally, students on many campuses have been trying to get the restaurant chain removed from campus offerings. But a statement released by Emory made no mention of the restaurant by name, and just referred to a student advisory committee having evaluated all options. A spokeswoman for the university said that the review of restaurant options predated the controversy over Chick-fil-A and was not related to Chick-fil-A's politics.

March 12, 2013

The University of Colorado at Boulder last year shut down a longstanding tradition of a major pot party on campus on April 20. Since then, Colorado residents voted to legalize marijuana, raising the hope of some that the university might not oppose the party this year. On Monday, the university made clear that the new statewide policy will have no impact on campus policy.  “We are committed to ending the unwelcome 4/20 gathering on the CU-Boulder campus, and this year’s approach represents the continuance of a multi-year plan to achieve that end,” said a statement from Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano. “What’s important here is the protection of CU’s missions of research, teaching and service. This isn’t about marijuana or drug laws. It’s about not disrupting the important work of a world-class university.”

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