Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 5, 2012

A federal judge has ruled that Florida cannot deny in-state tuition rates to students who are U.S. citizens with Florida residency who can't prove that their parents have the legal right to live in the United States. The case is not about those students brought to the United States as children, the subject of much debate, but about students born in the United States who are by definition citizens. Florida's regulations requiring them to provide information about their parents' immigration status violate these students' rights, the judge ruled. The only issue that matters is the students' citizenship, ruled Judge K. Michael Moore. He noted that the benefits of higher education (admission and in-state tuition rates) "are properly viewed as attaching to the student and not the household." It is the students, not the parents, he added, who will have their names on the diplomas.

 

September 4, 2012

Another faculty in Minnesota has weighed in on the November vote on the proposed amendment to the state constitution to ban gay marriage. During the first faculty meeting of the year, professors at St. Olaf College voted overwhelmingly to oppose the amendment. The college has said it will not take an official position on the issue, which another Lutheran college in Minnesota, Augsburg College, did in August.

September 4, 2012

A new obstacle has emerged for the business school of the University of California at Los Angeles, which has been pushing a "self-sufficiency plan" for its M.B.A. program, in which it would give up state funds in return for more independence. The plan, seen as privatization by critics, has been debated for some time. A vote by the UCLA faculty in June appeared to clear the way for final approval by the University of California system.

But a committee of the systemwide Academic Senate has now tabled the proposal to approve the plan. According to the committee, the system does not currently have any policy that would allow a program that is not self-supporting to become self-supporting. Lacking such a policy, the committee declined to approve the UCLA plan. Officials of the business school could not be reached to discuss the implications of this development.

September 4, 2012

City College of San Francisco, already facing deep budget cuts and threats that its accreditation may be removed, has yet another problem. State audits have determined that the college placed some non-academic employees in a pension system reserved for academic employees, and that inaccurate figures were used to calculate pensions for yet other employees, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Some of the employees and retirees have been told that they are being kicked out of the pension system.

September 4, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Erran Carmel of American University explains the challenges time zones pose to an increasingly international workforce. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

September 4, 2012

The U.S. Justice Department announced last week that it is joining a whistle-blower lawsuit against ATI Enterprises Inc., which owns a chain of for-profit career colleges in Texas. State authorities have already revoked the licenses for some of the programs to operate. The government's complaint alleges that ATI misrepresented job placement statistics in order to keep state approval in place.

Further, the complaint states that that "ATI employees at the three campuses knowingly enrolled students who were ineligible because they did not have high school diplomas or recognized equivalents; falsified high school diplomas, including five Dallas Independent School District diplomas for students who later defaulted on their federal student loans; fraudulently kept students enrolled even though they should have been dropped because they had poor grades or attendance; and made knowing misrepresentations to students about their future employability.   The alleged misrepresentations included telling students that a criminal record would not prevent them from getting jobs in their fields of study, quoting higher salaries than the students would be likely to earn and reporting inflated job placement statistics both to the students and the Texas Workforce Commission."

ATI officials could not be reached for comment.

September 4, 2012

Chinese universities are attracting more foreign students for degree programs, not just study abroad programs for a semester or year, China Daily reported. This year, Peking University has 1,500 new international students -- 900 of whom have enrolled in degree programs.

September 4, 2012

Russian legislators are considering and are expected to approve legislation that would shrink the number of universities, The Moscow Times reported. The idea behind the shift is for the nation to emerge with stronger universities that might fare well in international rankings. The University Professors Union has criticized the bill for not providing a way to increase faculty salaries.

September 4, 2012

The University of Central Oklahoma has settled a lawsuit by 12 former students and employees, who charged the former debate coach with harassment and retaliation, the Associated Press reported. The lawsuit claimed that the former coach -- Eric Marlow -- threatened to take a scholarship away from a student if she didn't have sex with him, and that he sent threatening text messages. A lawyer for Marlow declined to comment except to confirm that the suit has been resolved. Details of the settlement were not released.

September 4, 2012

A freshman who was a pledge at Theta Chi and who was at an event with drinking Saturday night died Sunday, The Fresno Bee reported. While the cause of death has not been officially determined, alcohol is viewed as a factor. The university is suspending Theta Chi. Seven years ago, a death in another fraternity house -- following a night of drinking -- prompted the university to announce a series of new steps to prevent alcohol abuse.

Pages

Back to Top