Sciences/Tech/Engineering/Math

Hunger Strike Could Return to MIT

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Professor says he will resume protest -- to death if need be -- if he doesn't receive tenure, but some faculty defend denial.

A Raise for the Record Books

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SUNY Albany nanoscience chief and professor sees his salary increase -- by $142,000, to about $667,000.

Admitted -- to College and Grad School

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To attack STEM shortage, CUNY chancellor proposes accepting promising freshmen into Ph.D. programs in science and math.

The Science Lab Is Flat

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Study documents increasing share of papers by American researchers with foreign partners.

Apples and Oranges in International Statistics

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New report warns of the limitations of international comparisons of educational achievement.

Momentum for Open Access

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Legislation requiring NIH-supported research to be online and free is on fast track, encouraging those who want that requirement for all federally supported research.

'Science' Will End Link to JSTOR

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Since JSTOR's founding in 1994, the popular online archive of scholarly journals hadn't had a single member publisher decide to walk away -- until this month. But last week, JSTOR lost a journal -- and not just any journal, but Science, the flagship publication of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and an early adopter of the JSTOR approach.

Where the Federal Research Funds Flow

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Hopkins retains first spot. New data show top recipients for black colleges (Hampton), Hispanic-serving institutions (Texas Health Sciences) and tribal colleges (United Tribes).

Enrollment Surge for Women

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Thanks to improved outreach efforts, engineering and technology universities are seeing a boost in female enrollments nearly across the board.

Who's Afraid of Incestuous Gay Monkey Sex?

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Sociologists -- especially those who study sexuality -- have for years done research that was considered controversial or troublesome by politicians or deans. Many scholars are proud of following their research ideas where they lead -- whatever others may think. But at a session Monday at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, sociologists considered the possibility that some of their colleagues may feel enough heat right now that they are avoiding certain topics or are being forced to compromise on either the language or substance of their research.

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