Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:00am

Legislation enacted in California in 2010 was supposed to assure smooth transfer from community colleges to California State University campuses, both by requiring the community colleges to create more transfer programs and the university system to make students who complete certain requirements automatically eligible for junior status. A new report by the Legislative Analyst's Office has found progress -- but only partial progress -- in meeting the goals. The community colleges are urged to create more transfer programs, and the Cal State system is urged to maximize the number of degree programs to which these transfer credits can provide junior-level status.

 

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 4:29am

An article in The Kalamazoo Gazette explores why adjuncts at Kalamazoo Valley Community College are in the process of trying to form a union. Part-timers at the college cite a mix of long-term grievances, such as contracts giving them no due process rights and stating that they could lose jobs due to student evaluations. There were also single incidents, such as a switch to paying them monthly, leaving many struggling when a paycheck arrived more than two weeks after it had been expected. College officials declined to comment on the grievances.

 

 

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 4:35am

The University of Southern California is planning to award degrees this year to nine Japanese-Americans who were students there during World War II and who were forced to end their studies when they were sent to internment camps, The Los Angeles Times reported. While many praise the move -- already undertaken by other colleges whose students from Japanese families were forced out during that time -- some say USC is not doing enough. Posthumous degrees are not being awarded to those who have died, for example. USC says that its polices would bar such degrees.

 

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 3:00am

The Korea Foundation is planning a significant expansion of programs designed to promote Korean studies in countries other than Korea, The Korea Herald reported. The Global E-School Program, which sets up centers at universities that mix locally based programs with real-life instruction from professors in South Korea, is one of the programs slated for expansion. The foundation currently supports 19 university centers in 12 countries. The foundation is starting an effort such that it would be supporting 57 centers in 23 countries.

 

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 3:00am

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the First Circuit has revived a whistle-blower lawsuit against two teaching hospitals affiliated with Harvard University's medical school. The suit claims that researchers violated the False Claims Act by submitting false statements about their research in grant applications to the National Institutes of Health. A lower court dismissed the suit, but the appeals court revived it, saying that the lower court incorrectly did not examine certain potential testimony and evidence that might have backed the whistle-blower claims. The appeals court ruling did not resolve the issues in the suit itself.

(Note: This article has been updated from an earlier version to correct the targets of the lawsuit.)

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 3:00am

A report Wednesday night in a reliable Texas blog that some members of the University of Texas Board of Regents were maneuvering to fire Bill Powers as president of the Austin campus had students and faculty members rallying behind Powers on Thursday. Regents who are close to Governor Rick Perry are reportedly angry that Powers has argued for small tuition increases for his campus, rather than the tuition freeze requested by Perry. Powers has also defended his faculty members from criticisms made by a think tank with close ties to Perry. Hours after the blog post revealed the tensions, students had created Facebook pages to line up support. In less than 24 hours, I Stand With Bill Powers had nearly 10,000 members, most of them students and alumni.

Many wrote that they trusted Powers's views of the university's budget needs and that they worried about the impact of the board rejecting his tuition requests or firing him. One woman who graduated last year wrote: "I full-heartedly support President Bill Powers as the President of our esteemed university. I know that if he leaves, the results will be devastating. There would be no top-quality candidate that would wish to work at a university where politics play such a heavy handed role, and where such a leader is not free to voice his opinion without fear of retaliation. President Powers has been an incredible driving force in raising the standard, rigor, and value of a University of Texas degree, and should continue to do so."

Faculty leaders were circulating a resolution Thursday, on which they hope to vote Monday, to back Powers. "Recognizing the extraordinary efforts exerted by UT Austin President Bill Powers and his administrative team in support of the recent proposal for a modest, well-documented, and crucial tuition increase, the Faculty Council strongly commends them for seeking to protect and enhance the quality of our students' education and the value of their degrees, as well as the research and public service achievements of the faculty. The fact that the regents ultimately rejected the proposal diminishes neither the campus's need for such financial support nor the efforts made to attain it," the resolution says.

Late Thursday, Powers released a short statement: "I love The University of Texas, and it’s an honor to serve as its president. I am deeply grateful for the support of our students, faculty, staff, and the thousands of members of the UT family. I will continue to work with the entire UT community to move the university forward. At this moment, I am focused on the more than 8,000 students who will graduate next week and make immeasurable contributions to society -- extending the university’s legacy of excellence and our positive impact on Texas."

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 4:26am

Universitas 21, a group of universities from around the world, has released a new international ranking of nations' higher education systems. Countries were evaluated on a series of measures related to resources (spending by governments and private sources); output (research and its impact and graduates who meet labor market needs); connectivity (international collaboration); and the higher education environment (government policies, diversity and other factors). Population was taken into account. The top five countries: United States, Sweden, Canada, Finland and Denmark.

 

 

Friday, May 11, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut explores the cutting-edge chemistry of the modern fine dining experience. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 4:27am

Paul Burka, a well-connected writer at The Texas Monthly, blogged Wednesday night -- to the alarm of many faculty members at the University of Texas at Austin -- that the job of President Bill Powers may be in jeopardy. Burka wrote that he had learned of a move by University of Texas regents to remove Powers because of his opposition to a tuition freeze. Governor Rick Perry, a Republican who has selected the regents, has pushed the tuition freeze. Powers has argued that the university can maintain access through financial aid, and that some additional tuition revenue is needed to assure the best possible educational experience for students. Powers has also rejected many of the criticisms made of the university system by a think tank close to Perry.

Burka wrote: "I was told that the situation is fluid and may be happening as I write. My understanding, based on what a source with knowledge of the proceedings has conveyed, is that regents’ chairman Gene Powell asked Chancellor Francisco Cigarroa to recommend that Powers be fired. Cigarroa refused. The next step will likely be a special meeting of the board to take action. I have no indication that notice of the meeting has been posted."

A spokesman for UT Austin said via e-mail to Inside Higher Ed that that the university would offer no comment on Burka's report.

Thursday, May 10, 2012 - 3:00am

A former adjunct instructor at the University of Missouri at Kansas City says administrators changed an athlete’s failing grade and then stopped offering his career development class when he objected.

The Kansas City Star reports that the instructor, Henry Lyons, flunked an athlete in fall 2010 but was instructed by administrators to give the athlete class participation points and allow him or her to rewrite an essay. Lyons protested the change and suspects the alteration was a way to keep the athlete eligible for competition.

Administrators questioned the amount of feedback on the initial essay and criticized his department-approved syllabus, Lyons told The Star. Lyons said he has contacted the National Collegiate Athletic Association asking for an investigation. UMKC told The Star it would cooperate with an investigation, but denies wrongdoing.

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