Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

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Thursday, March 1, 2012 - 3:00am

These meetings, conferences, seminars and other events will be held in the coming weeks in and around higher education. They are among the many such that appear in our calendar, to which campus and other officials can submit their own events. Our site also includes a comprehensive catalog of job changes in higher education; please submit your news to both listings.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

Smith College students and alumnae have come up with a creative response to an alumna's letter to The Sophian, the student newspaper, questioning efforts over the last decade to recruit more low-income and minority students. The letter (currently removed from the newspaper's website) suggested that the college has lowered its standards and abandoned a tradition in which wealthy students with "cashmere coats and pearls" were educated at the college and then went on to become wealthy donors. In response, Smith students have started posting their stories on a new blog called Pearls and Cashmere. Many of the women talk about how they do not fit the stereotypes of the past, and are proud of what Smith has become. Their stories stress that strong academics and diversity are by no means incompatible. And while the women pose in nontraditional ways for the photos that accompany their stories, many put on their pearls.

The letter that set off the fracas said that Smith attracts lesbians, low-income students and those who can't get into the Ivies. But the women who tell their stories on the blog -- white and minority, lesbian and straight -- talk about what they gained from enrolling at Smith, and at a more diverse Smith.

Birgitta Hendron from Washington state and Wiame El Bouhali from Morocco posted together: "Both of us applied to Smith early decision, both of us speak four languages (though not the same four), both of us are products of public school systems on two different continents. Without Smith, Wiame never would have had the chance to study the liberal arts (or build a tornado simulator). Without Smith, Birgitta never would have taken Russian -- the language that has become her passion. In addition to a world-class education and brilliant professors and peers, Smith has given us courage, perspective and confidence. It’s also given us each other -- not lesbians, not Ivy League rejects, but best friends."

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 4:29am

A state judge has awarded most of a woman's estate to the foundation that supports Southeastern Louisiana University, finding that the woman's final will -- which left the money elsewhere -- was invalid, The Advocate reported. The judge backed evidence presented by the college that the woman didn't understand the last will, just before her death. Family members who benefited from the final will in turn charged that the university had showered attention on the woman to get her to set up the bequest that will now stand. The estate is worth about $380,000.

 

 

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 4:31am

Students and faculty members are pressing Harvard University to award posthumous degrees to seven students expelled in the 1920s for being gay or being perceived as gay, the Associated Press reported. The students were kicked out after secret trials that only came to light in 2002. At that time, university officials apologized for what had happened. But the organizers of the movement to award posthumous degrees say that the apologies don't go far enough. A rally on the issue is planned for today, when Lady Gaga will be on campus to launch a new anti-bullying foundation. Harvard's policy for years has been to award posthumous degrees only in the rare circumstance where someone has completed degree requirements and died prior to receiving a degree.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Katherine Parkin of Monmouth University explains a fading American custom that made it acceptable for a woman to propose marriage. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

Not all Republican presidential candidates question the wisdom of encouraging Americans to seek higher education. Newt Gingrich said Tuesday that President Obama's statements urging all Americans to get at least one year of postsecondary education are "perfectly reasonable," The Hill reported. Gingrich's comments -- on the "Today" show -- differed sharply from those of Rick Santorum, who has been calling President Obama "a snob" for urging all Americans to get some higher education. Gingrich said, "Everybody in America is going to have to get re-educated all the time because jobs are going to change, technology is going to change, and if we're going to compete in the world market, we both have to have the best equipment and the best training."

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 4:34am

Northeastern University announced Tuesday that, based on student concerns, it will not consider Chick-Fil-A for a spot in the student union, The Boston Globe reported. The Student Senate recommended the action Monday, based on reports that Chick-Fil-A has donated heavily to groups that lobby against measures that promote equity for gay people. The company did not respond to requests for comment, but has in the past denied being opposed to any groups.

 

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

The House of Representatives voted 303-114 Tuesday to repeal the Education Department's credit hour and state authorization regulations, with 69 Democrats joining the all of the chamber's Republicans to back the bill. Higher education groups cheered the House's actions, but the next step for the measure is unclear.

While the bill might be able to attract enough Democratic support in the Senate to become law, the Obama administration has said it strongly opposes any attempt to repeal the regulations, and the chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions has waged a high-profile fight against for-profit colleges. The state authorization and credit hour rules apply to nonprofit, public and for-profit institutions, but Democrats who voted against the measure characterized it as an effort to erode consumer protections.

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

The U.S. Justice Department announced Tuesday that the government would join a lawsuit in which former employees of American Commercial College, Inc., allege that the for-profit college chain falsely asserted its compliance with federal requirements that it derive at least 10 percent of its revenues from sources other than federal student aid. The class action was brought under the federal False Claims Act, which allows individuals to bring lawsuits on behalf of the federal government, claiming that the defendants have defrauded the treasury of funds and hoping to be joined by the U.S. Justice Department. The plaintiff shares in any financial penalties, which can include trebled damages.

American Commercial College, Inc., operates five campuses in Texas and one in Louisiana.

For-profit higher education providers have been a target of numerous False Claims Act lawsuits, and the federal government has joined several of them, including a high-profile case involving Education Management Corp. Some have speculated that the Obama administration -- which has toughened its oversight of the career college sector through regulation -- is increasingly turning to the courts to do so as well.

In announcing Tuesday's intervention, Tony West, assistant attorney general of the Justice Department’s civil division, said: “Colleges and universities that receive federal funds must be honest with the government and follow the law.... We will use the False Claims Act and other tools to protect students and taxpayers from for-profit institutions that fail to measure up to that standard.”

 

Wednesday, February 29, 2012 - 3:00am

California's community colleges need a sharper, more focused set of goals and the state needs a stronger body to oversee the institutions, a bipartisan panel focused on improving state programs said in a report Tuesday. The Little Hoover Commission argued that the state's scores of two-year institutions suffer because they try to do too many things with too few resources, and that Californians would be better off if the colleges focused on student success in three main areas: basic skills education, career technical education, and preparation for transfer to four-year institutions. It also calls for making the colleges' chancellor's office an independent agency with more authority and responsibility, and for allocating funds to community colleges in ways that encourage and reward student success.

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