Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

February 27, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Elliot Berkman of the University of Oregon reveals the limits of brain training. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

February 27, 2014

A coalition of higher education, business and other groups seek to make the case for more federal investment in research and higher education with a four-minute video explaining the "innovation deficit." The groups hope to remind members of Congress (and those who influence them) about the important contributions that scientific and other research make to the knowledge economy -- and the economy at large.

February 27, 2014

The associations that represent allopathic and osteopathic medical schools announced Wednesday that they had agreed to a common system for accrediting U.S. providers of graduate medical education. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the American Osteopathic Association, and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine said that under the arrangement, the osteopathic associations would become members of the graduate medical education group, and that the joint accrediting system would allow "graduates of allopathic and osteopathic medical schools to complete their residency and/or fellowship education in ACGME-accredited programs and demonstrate achievement of common milestones and competencies."

 

February 27, 2014

A new law has made Washington State the fifth state where students who lack the legal documentation to live permanently in the United States are eligible for state student aid, Reuters reported. Governor Jay Inslee, a Democrat, said that the law would help "thousands of bright, talented and very hard working students across the state of Washington."

February 27, 2014

A faculty committee has recommended that Harvard University adopt policies designating specific officials to authorize an email search and -- in most cases -- to inform anyone whose email is searched, The Boston Globe reported. The recommendation follows a controversy in 2012 in which many email accounts were secretly searched. Harvard has not had clear policies on the issue, the committee found. The panel said that there needs to be a "legitimate" or "important" reason for such searches. And that reason -- not an email account holder's status as a student or employee or as a certain kind of employee, such as tenured professor -- should dictate whether a search is performed.

 

February 26, 2014

A state judge has backed the City University of New York on a challenge by its faculty union to the controversial "Pathways" program to align the curriculum to ease transfer from CUNY's two-year to four-year colleges. The Professional Staff Congress, the union, challenged the system's legal authority to institute a major academic change, arguing that faculty members needed to play more of a role. A state judge found this argument "devoid of merit."  The faculty union is vowing to appeal the judge's decision, and is also urging the New York City Council to intervene in the dispute.

 

February 26, 2014

Modesto Junior College has settled a lawsuit with a student who was forbidden from handing out copies of the U.S. Constitution on Constitution Day in September. Army veteran Robert Van Tuinen had argued that administrators violated his First Amendment rights. Video captured campus officials telling Van Tuinen to book a “free speech area,” which would take at least three days. As part of the settlement, the college will revise its policies to allow free speech in open areas across campus and will pay Van Tuinen $50,000.

February 26, 2014

Some students and faculty members at St. Joseph's University, in Pennsylvania, are concerned about plans to deal with a deficit by increasing enrollment, The Philadelphia Inquirer reported. The university is facing an $8.7 million budget shortfall. Administrators have already imposed budget cuts throughout the campus, and argue that they can deal with some of the remaining financial challenges by increasing this fall's freshman class from 1,275 to 1,500. Critics say such an increase will lead to larger class sizes and/or lower admissions standards.

 

February 26, 2014

The University of Cambridge's Regent House (the governing board, made up largely of academics) has approved a controversial endowed chair to honor Stephen Hawking, Times Higher Education reported. The controversy is not over honoring Hawking, but because the size of the endowment will support a salary nearly double that paid to other professors. Further, the terms of the gift specify that the salary must be "equal to or greater than the average salary and benefits" for other professors "of similar years of service, or rank" in the department of applied mathematics and theoretical physics. Critics objected to the salary provisions, and the chair was approved by a margin of 746 to 606.

 

February 26, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Nicholas Leadbeater of the University of Connecticut concludes his three-day examination of the chemistry of the show "Breaking Bad." Leadbeater concludes the series with an examination of one of Walter White’s greatest escapes. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

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