Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

Subscribe to Inside Higher Ed | Quick Takes
Thursday, April 5, 2012 - 4:34am

A new study published in the journal Psychological Science suggests that students in states with greater levels of income inequality are more likely to engage in academic dishonesty. The study examined the rates at which people in different states conduct Google searches for topics such as "buy term paper," and found more such searches in states with more income inequality. Lukas Neville, a doctoral student at Queen's University, in Canada, said that the study was based on the idea that trusting environment promote honest behavior and that income inequality may be associated with environments that lack trust.

Thursday, April 5, 2012 - 4:37am

New York University, which named the former president of Swarthmore College to lead NYU Abu Dhabi, has named another former campus leader to head NYU Shanghai. This morning NYU named Jeffrey S. Lehman, chancellor and founding dean of the Peking University School of Transnational Law, to lead the Shanghai campus, which will be a full, degree-awarding institution enrolling its first undergraduate class in 2013. The law school Lehman has led in China is the first in that country to teach an American style J.D. curriculum. Formerly, Lehman was president of Cornell University and dean of the law school at the University of Michigan.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 4:33am

The North Dakota Supreme Court on Wednesday refused to block a statewide referendum in June on whether the University of North Dakota should maintain its "Fighting Sioux" nickname, The Grand Forks Herald reported. The name has offended many Native Americans for years (though others have endorsed it and many of the university's athletic fans are passionate about it). The National Collegiate Athletic Association has imposed sanctions on colleges with such names and that has led the university's leaders, with some reluctance, to agree to change the name. But state lawmakers intervened with a law blocking a name change, and when they reversed themselves, an item was placed on the June ballot to preserve the name.

Robert Kelley, president of the University of North Dakota, issued a statement after the Supreme Court announced that it would not block a state vote. "Now that the North Dakota Supreme Court has made its decision, it is important that the voters of North Dakota become fully educated about the potential ramifications of their vote on this issue in June," he said. "[I]f the referendum is passed in June, the University of North Dakota will remain under NCAA sanctions and that this will have a damaging effect on UND’s athletics teams, and will compromise recruitment, scheduling and UND’s relationship with other collegiate athletics programs.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Susan Collins examines the effectiveness of alcohol prohibition at facilities providing transitional housing for the homeless. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 3:00am

A 50 percent improvement in community college graduation rates would create $5.3 billion in taxpayer revenue as well as $30 billion more in lifetime income for the 160,000 new graduates, according to a study by Mark Schneider, a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, and Lu Michelle Yin, an economist and researcher at the American Institutes for Research. The report praised Valencia College for its "competency-based model," and said community colleges could boost graduation rates by streamlining the degree path, using more online courses and borrowing innovations from for-profit colleges.

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 3:00am

Unite Here, a labor group, announced Tuesday that Harvard University was going to stop investing in HEI Hospitality, a company accused of unfair treatment of its workers (a charge it has denied). The Unite Here announcement said that Harvard was joining "a growing trend of universities across the country distancing themselves" from the company.  The group released e-mail messages from Harvard officials to confirm the decision. But those e-mail messages said that the reason for the decision had nothing to do with the accusations made by Unite Here against HEI. An e-mail from the head of the Harvard Management Company said: "Harvard Management Company has decided not to reinvest in funds managed by HEI. Importantly, this decision was based on factors related to the HMC portfolio and its strategy and needs; not on concerns about HEI's practices."

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 3:00am

The U.S. Education Department has told Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College, in Indiana, to repay $42 million in grant and loans funds that the agency says the college was not eligible to award, the Associated Press reported. The department said that the college classified many students as being in telecommunications courses when their proper category was correspondence courses. The aid and loan funds provided are not permitted at institutions with a large share of students in correspondence courses. College officials said that they had done nothing wrong and would challenge the finding.

 

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 3:00am

Professors at the University of Ottawa, in Canada, want the right to bar laptops from their classrooms, CTV Ottawa News reported. Marcel Turcotte, one of the professors pushing the idea, said of his students: "They are distracted and we are competing with that for their attention.... You see one student who is really not listening, would be watching the video and then it's kind of contagious." A faculty vote is planned for May.

 

Wednesday, April 4, 2012 - 4:30am

Students protesting Santa Monica College's plan to institute a two-tiered tuition policy tried to storm a meeting of the college's board Tuesday night, and were met with campus police and pepper spray, The Los Angeles Times reported. Several protesters suffered minor injuries and others were overcome with pepper spray. The college says its plan is a creative way to deal with deep budget cuts. But students say that the plan effectively favors those who can afford to pay more, and abandons the community college traditions of equity and access.

 

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 4:38am

Canada's York University -- facing faculty opposition -- has announced that it will not accept a $30 million gift from a think tank to create a new teaching and research center. Professors objected to the idea of sharing decision-making over faculty hires with the think tank, arguing that principles of academic freedom and autonomy require such matters to stay within the university. A statement issued Monday by Patrick Monahan, the university's provost, reiterated administrators' belief that "this initiative held tremendous opportunity and promise." But the statement went on to say that "we know for this initiative to be successful, however, it required broad support from the university." The latest faculty vote against the plan "indicates that the necessary support is not present and, accordingly, we cannot proceed," Monahan added.

 

Pages

Search for Jobs

Back to Top