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Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

The retirement package for John Sperling, the recently retired founder of the Apollo Group (parent company of the University of Phoenix) "likely won’t do the company any favors on the PR front," The Wall Street Journal reported. Sperling will receive $5 million in a "special retirement bonus," an annuity of $70,833.33 a month, ownership of two Apollo vehicles he used while he was chairman and "reasonable out-of-pocket” medical- and dental-care coverage.

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

A group of students and a former dean filed a complaint last week with the Education Department's Office for Civil Rights, alleging that the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill violated a series of federal laws protecting the rights of sexual assault survivors, The Huffington Post and The Daily Tar Heel student newspaper reported. Melinda Manning, the former associate dean of students who reportedly resigned over the institution's handling of sexual assault cases, said the individuals who run the campus judicial system did not receive adequate training for the job and mistreated victims, asking inappropriate questions and blaming victims. The complaint says upper-level administrators pressured Manning to underreport sexual assault statistics to the federal government and discouraged her from approaching Chancellor Holden Thorp about her concerns.

The complaint, filed on behalf of 64 assault victims, says UNC violated the Campus Sexual Assault Victims' Bill of Rights, the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, and the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

An online petition campaign organized by Avaaz.org draws attention to the plight of Syrian students who are unable to pay tuition fees, including government-sponsored students whose tuition payments have been stopped. A statement released Friday by the Minister for Universities and Science, David Willetts, asked universities and funding agencies to exercise discretion over tuition and to use hardship funds to support students when possible. The statement notes that all institutions that enroll Syrian students through the Syrian Higher Education Capacity Building Project have agreed to waive or defer fees.

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

Dixie State College's board has voted to request a name change to Dixie State University, but not to abandon the "Dixie" portion of its name. The institution is located in a part of Utah settled by immigrants from the South who embraced the Dixie name and Confederate imagery. As the college debating becoming a university, some affiliated with the university said that it would be a good time to change its name entirely, and to end associations that some saw as exclusionary.

Steven G. Caplin, the board chair, issued a statement: "As with stakeholders at large, the trustees saw the merits of several different naming options, and the majority preferred 'Dixie State University.' In the end the board chose to unite as one body. We unanimously stand behind the Dixie State University name and encourage all stakeholders to do the same. This is the time to combine our resources, make our best contributions, and rally around this great institution."

Roi Wilkins, a senior at the college who is African-American, told The Salt Lake Tribune that the college was ignoring the extent to which its name is associated with oppression. "I feel like they’re still trying to sweep it under the rug," he said.

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

Classes resume at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities this week and officials have suspended a rule that normally requires a doctor's note to miss the first day of classes, the Associated Press reported. There are so many flu cases that officials want to encourage students to stay home if they are ill.

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

Ghostwriting of term papers is so common in Russia that those who do the work openly advertise their services, Radio Free Europe / Radio Liberty reported. A woman based in Tatarstan told the news service: "Theses start from 5,000 rubles [$165]. But it depends on how much the person can pay; the price is agreed individually. I don't copy anything from the Internet and I do my research in libraries. I care about my professional reputation; I don't want to lose clients."

 

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Darla Zelenitsky of the University of Calgary reveals a find that is a first for North American paleontology. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Monday, January 21, 2013 - 4:14am

Governor Jerry Brown, a California Democrat, is proposing to expand various reforms to assure speedier completion of programs at California community colleges, The Los Angeles Times reported. Brown wants students who exceed 90 credits of work to pay for the full cost of instruction, arguing that this would free up space in the crowded system. But some students say that this would punish those with double majors or who don't immediately find the field that they want to pursue.

 

Friday, January 18, 2013 - 3:00am

The American Medical Association on Thursday announced a $10 million, five-year campaign to encourage medical schools to rethink how they educate future doctors. The medical group says it hopes its grants will spur new methods for teaching or assessing competencies for medical students, improving understanding of the health care system in medical training, and strengthening the professionalism of future doctors.

Friday, January 18, 2013 - 3:00am

A group of senior faculty members are complaining that the Massachusetts Institute of Technology is putting business interests ahead of the needs of graduate students and other campus constituents in a zoning proposal for expansion on and around its campus, The Boston Globe reported. The newspaper cited the faculty members' complaints that the proposal by the MIT Investment Management Company would prioritize commercial development over education and research purposes and pays too little attention to the pressing lack of affordable housing for graduate students.

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