Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - 3:00am

The National Labor Relations Board has impounded ballots from an election at Duquesne University to decide whether adjuncts there can form a union. The ballots will be sealed until the NLRB rules on an appeal by the university. Duquesne, a Roman Catholic university, previously agreed to the election, but then decided to challenge it on the grounds that its religious affiliation exempts it from an union election. The Pittsburgh office of the NLRB denied that motion to withdraw from the election but the university appealed the decision to the national office. The election ballots were to be counted Tuesday, after a mail-in election.

Wednesday, July 11, 2012 - 3:00am

Edward Blews Jr., president of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities of Michigan, has been appointed the next president of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. He begins the new position Jan. 1, 2013. Blews hasn't previously represented Christian colleges and universities as such -- the association is made up of 116 regionally accredited Christian colleges and universities that hire only Christians as full-time faculty and staff. But the Michigan association has religious colleges as members and Blews received his undergraduate degree from Seattle Pacific University, a member of the council, and previously served on the council's governing board. Three members of the council are also members of the Michigan group.

Paul Corts, the current president, is retiring at the end of this year.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

Adjunct instructors are getting some help (rhetorically, at least) from the country’s largest education union. The National Education Association’s Representative Assembly voted overwhelmingly last week to ask the Department of Labor to help cut "them"adjuncts get unemployment benefits. The union will ask the department to issue an advisory letter saying that adjuncts lack “reasonable assurance” of work, and are eligible to collect unemployment benefits when out of work.

Maria Maisto, president of the New Faculty Majority, said that adjuncts struggle to get unemployment benefits during the summer months when they are not teaching, and that universities often contest their claims by saying they have a chance of getting rehired. Even if the letter is issued, though, it would be non-binding. “But it is something that individual adjuncts can use as they are making their claim,” Maisto said.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

A year after the British government essentially tripled tuitions, applications for university spots fell by nearly 9 percent in Britain and by 10 percent in England, Times Higher Education reported. Applications from students of traditional college age fell less sharply than did those from older students, and government officials played down the impact of the dip; “the proportion of English school-leavers applying to university is the second highest on record and people are still applying,” David Willetts, the universities and science minister, told the newspaper. But others said the decrease was the predictable result of the dramatic change in government policy.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

Pennsylvania State University fund-raisers took in $208 million in the 2011-12 academic year, the second-most in institutional history, despite spending much of the year wracked in intense controversy related to child sexual abuse charges against a longtime football coach, the Centre Daily Times reported. But pledges and other measures of long-term giving were down, the newspaper reported.

Tuesday, July 10, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Cynthia Ebinger of the University of Rochester explains the connection between earthquakes, volcanism, and the changing thickness of the Earth’s tectonic plates. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

President Obama and many educators are encouraging more American students to earn advanced degrees in science, but the jobs may not be there for those who do so, The Washington Post reported. There are fewer jobs in academe, but also in many of the business fields that have in the past hired science Ph.D.s. Many companies have slashed research jobs, the Post noted.


Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

Vienna Medical University is taking some criticism (particularly from men) for a policy that favors female applicants. The Associated Press reported that the university adjusts admissions test scores -- which determine admission -- based on the average scores for men and women. Since women score lower, on average, than do men, a score by a female applicant counts for more than the exact same score by a man. For instance, in the case of a man and woman both scoring 130, the woman's test grade would be 117.7 and the man's would be 114.8 because the average score for women on the exam is 97 and the average score for males is 102. Some women have joined men in questioning the policy, saying that they fear they will be seen as "quota women."


Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am
  • Jane E. Clark, professor of kinesiology at the University of Maryland at College Park, has been named dean of the School of Public Health there.
  • Tom Gattis, associate vice president for academics at the Hong Kong campus of Savannah College of Art & Design, has been named chair of industrial design at Columbus College of Art & Design.
  • Kenneth C. Gotsch, CFO/vice chancellor of finance at City Colleges of Chicago, has been chosen as CFO at Columbia College Chicago.
  • Sheila Dove Jones, interim director of the Office of Planning and Assessment at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, has been promoted to the job on a permanent basis.
  • Lori A. Lewis, vice president for advancement at Marietta College, in Ohio, has been selected as vice president for institutional advancement at McDaniel College, in Maryland.
  • Sylvia Spears, assistant vice president for academic initiatives at New England College, in New Hampshire, has been appointed as vice president for diversity and inclusion at at Emerson College, in Massachusetts.

The appointments above are drawn from Inside Higher Ed's job changes database. To submit news about job changes and promotions, please click here.

Monday, July 9, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Greg Wilson of the University of Washington reveals how a slight change in tooth shape allowed early mammals to compete in a world dominated by dinosaurs. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


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