Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, September 1, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, the University of Texas at Austin's Michael Webber discusses how when we waste food, we are also wasting valuable energy. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The father of a Frostburg State University football player said doctors had told him that his son died from “severe head trauma,” The New York Times reported Tuesday. While the NCAA and Ivy League have recently ramped up safety precautions to treat concussions properly or avoid them altogether, death by head trauma is extremely rare in college sports; it is most common among youth and high school football players. According to the University of North Carolina’s Center for Catastrophic Sport Injury Research, from 1982 through 2010, 113 high school football players died from injuries that resulted in a brain or spinal cord injury or skull or spinal fracture -- while at the college level, nine died. The most recent death was in 2002-3. The Times report noted that “a different cause of death could be identified as facts of his case emerge.”

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The National Collegiate Athletic Association on Tuesday reinstated eight football players whom the University of Miami had declared ineligible last week after news broke that they got improper benefits from a booster, but the association required most of them to sit out games and to repay the value of the goods they received. The players include Miami’s quarterback, who must sit out the season opener next week. The athlete who will sit out the most games -- six -- received more than $1,200 in benefits, the NCAA said. The benefits included food, transportation and nightclub cover charges. In addition to those eight, five other players who were implicated in the investigation have been cleared to participate, but one was suspended indefinitely. Miami responded to the news with its own statement saying it "will be more vigilant" when it comes to compliance.

The university itself is still under a separate investigation (through the NCAA's enforcement process, as opposed to its system for determining player eligibility) into whether officials knew about the scandal. Tuesday's announcement about eligibility decisions includes some language that could suggest trouble ahead for Miami: in several cases it notes that players received money or gifts not only from the booster, Nevin Shapiro, but from "athletics personnel," suggesting that the NCAA has concluded that university employees participated in the wrongdoing.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

In today's Academic Minute, Mark Harrison of the University of Warwick reveals that despite expectations to the contrary, conflicts across the globe are on the rise, and have been for over a century. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Syrian supporters of President Bashar al-Assad launched an attack on a Facebook page that appears to be affiliated with Columbia University (but isn't) Tuesday, posting numerous messages praising Assad. The Washington Post reported that a group called the Syrian Electronic Army was responsible, and that its motives were not clear. Some Assad critics later posted to Columbia's page apologizing for the pro-Assad posts. (This item has been corrected from an earlier version.)

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The number of Hispanic-serving institutions -- those where undergraduate enrollment is at least 25 percent Latino -- continues to increase, according to an analysis released today by Excelencia in Education. In 2009-10, there were 293 such institutions, up from 236 six years earlier. More than half of Latino undergraduates are enrolled in these institutions. Almost half of the institutions (137 of them) were community colleges. Excelencia in Education also identified another 204 colleges as "emerging" Hispanic-serving institutions, those with Latino enrollments of 15-24 percent.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Dan Middlemiss, a professor at Dalhousie University, in Halifax, became so frustrated this week by the lack of parking that he quit, CBC News reported. Middlemiss had taught at the university for 31 years. Dalhousie has 2,000 parking spaces for 17,000 students and 3,000 employees.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Iona College has suspended its provost, Warren Rosenberg, citing "inaccuracies in student performance data" that the college had reported, The Journal News reported. Details were not released. Rosenberg did not respond to a call to his office.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Syrian supporters of President Bashar al-Assad launched an attack on Columbia University's Facebook page Tuesday, posting numerous messages praising Assad. The Washington Post reported that a group called the Syrian Electronic Army was responsible, and that its motives were not clear. Some Assad critics later posted to Columbia's page apologizing for the pro-Assad posts.

Wednesday, August 31, 2011 - 3:00am

One year removed from high school, 86 percent of new graduates believe that college is "worth the time and money," according to a new survey by the College Board. The majority holds (at 76 percent) for those who have not gone to college. The survey also found that 90 percent of all new high school graduates agree with the statement: "In today's world, high school is not enough, and nearly everybody needs to complete some kind of education or training after high school." Of those in college, 54 percent reported that their courses were more difficult than they expected, and many students said that they wished that they had taken more rigorous courses in high school.

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