Higher Education Quick Takes

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Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Marquette University announced Thursday that it will start to offer domestic partner benefits to employees in 2012, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. Both faculty and student groups have asked the university to start the benefit. Marquette, a Roman Catholic university, has faced scrutiny over its treatment of gay employees since its move last year to rescind a job offer to a lesbian scholar for a dean's position. Rev. Robert A. Wild, Marquette's president, sent a message to the campus Thursday explaining the decision to offer benefits. "If we are truly pastoral in our application of the Jesuit principle of cura personalis, I asked myself if I could reconcile that with denying health benefits to a couple who have legally registered their commitment to each other," he said. Cura personalis means "care for the entire person."

Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

The Institute of International Education has created an emergency fund to help economically distressed students from Japan who are studying on campuses in the United States. The fund, established with support from the Freeman Foundation, will provide grants of up to $5,000 for students from the regions of Japan most affected by the recent earthquake and tsunami. Accredited American campuses can nominate students on the institute's website.

Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

The Association for University and College Counseling Center Directors has issued a statement decrying the development of a video game that lets the player take on the role of a student who, a la Columbine or Virginia Tech, shoots up classrooms and campuses before killing him- or herself. The game, "School Shooter: North American Tour 2012" is being developed as a modification of Source, a 3D game environment, and its pending development has been gaining notoriety among campus student affairs and legal officials, though they have debated whether drawing attention to the product might lend it credence. The statement from the counseling directors group calls on the makers of the game to stop its production. "As campus mental health professionals who first hand experience the tragedy and devastation that occurs in the aftermath of campus violence," it says, "AUCCCD believes the production of such products is most deplorable and unfortunate."

Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of Texas Board of Regents is ending a special position it created recently for Rick O'Donnell, who in his work at a think tank has questioned why universities spend so much time and effort on research, The Austin American-Statesman reported. Many faculty members and others have questioned why a research university's board would hire someone hostile to one of its key missions. O'Donnell's think tank and most of the regents are close to Governor Rick Perry, a Republican.

Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Bakersfield College, a two-year institution in California, on Thursday announced a gift of nearly $14 million, most of which will support scholarships. The announcement said the gift was the largest ever to any community college, topping the previous record of $10 million (to Santa Monica City College). Officials of the Council for Resource Development, a group of community college development officials, said that they did not have a definitive list of the largest gifts to community colleges. But at least one community college, Clark College in Washington State, reports that its foundation received gifts that should be counted as the previous top gift at the very least. In the 1990s, Clark received a gift of $12 million and a bequest shortly after of $13 million (from the same donor), and the two donations were so close together that the college has considered them a single gift. But Lisa Gibert, who heads the foundation at Clark, said that they were technically two gifts, so Bakersfield has a claim on the top spot among community college gifts.

Friday, March 25, 2011 - 3:00am

Ralph Nader has a new target: athletic scholarships. Nader is planning to seek support for the campaign from college presidents, Congress and the Education Department, the Associated Press reported. "As we near the exciting conclusion of 'March Madness' — which would more accurately be described as the 2011 NCAA Professional Basketball Championships — it's time we step back and finally address the myth of amateurism surrounding big-time college football and basketball in this country," said Nader. A spokesman for the National Collegiate Athletic Association told the AP that it was unfair for Nader to call college athletes professionals. "They are students, just like any other student on campus who receives a merit-based scholarship," he said.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Buffalo State College's Dwight Hennessy reveals that while cultures around the globe may be drastically different, the psychology of driving often transcends cultural divides. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

Kent State University, facing deep budget cuts, has limited enrollments in American Sign Language courses to those students who need the language for their majors or minors, The Ravenna Record Courier reported. Students say that the limits are discriminatory because non-majors are still permitted in introductory Spanish and other languages. But officials say that sections of those languages have been cut as well, and that there is no money for more ASL sections.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

The Organization of American Historians has adopted new standards for the employment of non-tenure-track faculty members, calling for departments to provide them with "clearly stated evaluation procedures," seniority benefits in hiring and pay, health insurance and other benefits, including access to funds for conference travel. On adjunct e-mail lists on Wednesday, the new standards were praised by some, but criticized by others as being too weak and not addressing larger inequities between those on and off the tenure track.

Thursday, March 24, 2011 - 3:00am

A University of Iowa investigation has concluded that a “strenuous squat lifting workout” was the primary cause of 13 Hawkeye football players being hospitalized with rhabdomyolysis, a rare muscle disorder, in January. Findings from the investigation were presented by President Sally Mason at a Board of Regents meeting Wednesday; the report further noted that the hospitalized football players “were in no way responsible for their own injuries,” “did nothing wrong” and “did not take banned substances or engage in other risky behaviors.” The investigation also found that coaches were neither “negligent” nor “reckless” when they “planned, conducted, or supervised the strenuous workouts” that resulted in the hospitalization of the 13 players and that “unforeseen developments [occurred] without the fault of anyone involved.”

At a news conference Wednesday, Coach Kirk Ferentz said: “We have learned a little bit more about [rhabdomyolysis]. Quite frankly, I don't think anybody in this building knew much about it prior to this occurrence. We've learned a little bit more about that, but I still think there's a lot to be learned from what I know. One thing about our sports medicine department, I think they'll take this as an opportunity to learn more. The one thing we have learned, we won't do that exercise again, pretty clear at this point, until we know more.”

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