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Thursday, July 7, 2011 - 3:00am

A study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academic of Sciences raises questions about the reasons that highly educated women have fewer children on average than do less educated women. Conventional wisdom holds that the time spent earning advanced degrees limits the childbearing of women who do so. But the study -- based on detailed analysis of women in Norway -- found that the childbearing gaps result from those women who have children at young ages not pursuing more education. The research was conducted by scholars at Rockefeller University and the University of Oslo.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Rumana Monzur, the graduate student at the University of British Columbia, returned to Vancouver on Tuesday, hoping for treatment that might allow her to see again, The Globe and Mail reported. Monzur's husband is charged in Bangladesh with blinding her while she was home to visit her family. Monzur's case has attracted considerable attention, and University of British Columbia colleagues are raising money to help her.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Tens of billions of dollars in cuts to some Medicare reimbursements and hospital payments are now on the table as part of the deficit-reduction talks between the White House and Congressional Republicans, and cuts in at least one area would affect the $9.5 billion Medicare pays to teaching hospitals each year, The New York Times reported Tuesday. Whether the cuts will become law depends on the outcome of the negotiations, but the American Council on Graduate Medical Education, as well as a coalition of hospital lobbyists that includes the Association of American Medical Colleges, has raised the alarm.

In an open letter, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which accredits residency programs, laid out its concerns about the changes. Medicare payments comprise the majority of funding for training medical residents and fellows, the council wrote. Losing the Medicare payments would mean that the small, often rural health-care providers that make up about half of group's 681 accredited programs might have to stop offering residencies. Larger providers might turn to industry sponsorship or ask residents to pay tuition. "Abrupt and dramatic reductions in Medicare [graduate medical education] funding will have a significant and adverse impact on both the number of residents educated and trained, and the quality of that education," the group wrote. "This will challenge the profession's responsibility as a public trust to produce the next generation of physicians to serve the needs of the American public through the provision of excellent, innovative, safe and affordable care."

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Yale University on Tuesday announced the completion of a five-year campaign that raised $3.881 billion, exceeding its goal of $3.5 billion. The campaign may be the most successful to date in higher education, but Columbia University is on track to meet its $4 billion campaign goal and has raised its target to $5 billion.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The law school and business school of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities are considering a plan that would have them give up state funds and gain more control over their spending, The Star Tribune reported. A number of professional schools of leading public universities have made such a move or considered it -- but the idea can be controversial.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The Middle East Studies Association is calling on Yale University to agree to an independent investigation of whether the Bush administration played any role in the university's decision not to offer a position to Juan Cole, a Middle East expert at the University of Michigan whose blog attracts a wide readership with his critiques of U.S. foreign policy. The candidacy of Cole for the position at Yale led to a flurry of lobbying by conservatives against his appointment. The Middle East Studies Association, in a letter to Yale officials released Tuesday, noted a recent report in The New York Times that some in the Bush administration were trying to discredit Cole at the time he was up for the Yale position. The letter argues that these reports require an investigation of whether they played any role in what happened to his candidacy. Yale officials were not available for comment.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Ben Trachtenberg of the University of Missouri School of Law discusses how economists value human life and why the lives of Americans are becoming more valuable. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The law school and business school of the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities are considering a plan that would have them give up state funds and gain more control over their spending, The Star Tribune reported. A number of professional schools of leading public universities have made such a move or considered it -- but the idea can be controversial.

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Tens of billions of dollars in cuts to some Medicare reimbursements and hospital payments are now on the table as part of the deficit-reduction talks between the White House and Congressional Republicans, and cuts in at least one area would affect the $9.5 billion Medicare pays to teaching hospitals each year, the New York Times reported Tuesday. Whether the cuts will become law depends on the outcome of the negotiations, but the American Council on Graduate Medical Education, as well as a coalition of hospital lobbyists that includes the Association of American Medical Colleges, has raised the alarm.

In an open letter, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, which accredits residency programs, laid out its concerns about the changes. Medicare payments comprise the majority of funding for training medical residents and fellows, the council wrote. Losing the Medicare payments would mean that the small, often rural health-care providers that make up about half of group's 681 accredited programs might have to stop offering residencies. Larger providers might turn to industry sponsorship or ask residents to pay tuition. "Abrupt and dramatic reductions in Medicare [graduate medical education] funding will have a significant and adverse impact on both the number of residents educated and trained, and the quality of that education," the group wrote. "This will challenge the profession's responsibility as a public trust to produce the next generation of physicians to serve the needs of the American public through the provision of excellent, innovative, safe and affordable care."

Wednesday, July 6, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Katie Monnin of the University of North Florida reveals how the use of graphic novels in the classroom can improve reading comprehension and attitudes about reading among young readers. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

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