Higher Education Quick Takes

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Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 4:18am

Meetings of the University of Missouri Board of Curators -- though in part open to the public -- typically have no members of the public in the audience. At this week's meeting, however, about 30 backers of the University of Missouri Press, which the university is eliminating, attended, hoping for a chance to speak. The Columbia Daily Tribune reported that the board gave them no chance to do so. At the end of the public agenda of the meeting, a time other boards take public comment, some board members went into a closed-door meetings while others went to a press conference on athletics, the newspaper reported.

 

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Lauren Ellman of Temple University examines the connection between a prenatal bout with the flu and an increased rate of schizophrenia. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 3:00am

House Republican leaders have tentatively agreed to a Senate deal to keep the interest rate on federally subsidized student loans at 3.4 percent for another year, the Associated Press reported Wednesday evening. The deal would extend the interest rate rather than let it double on July 1, but pay for the extension in part by cutting eligibility for students who have been enrolled for more than six years for a bachelor's degree or three years for an associate degree.

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 3:00am

The British newspaper The Telegraph sent undercover reporters to talk to admissions agents in China about the chances of gaining admission to competitive British universities, and the answers have created a stir. According to the newspaper, agents that represent the universities are telling people in China that they can earn admission with significantly lower test scores than would be needed by a British student. The Telegraph has also reported that headmasters of some British schools are reporting that their non-British students are earning admission to universities while British students with better test scores are being rejected. The suspicion of many is that British universities, which may charge much more to foreign students than those from Britain, are favoring those from overseas.

Times Higher Education reported that Cardiff University, one of the institutions named in the Telegraph article, has started an investigation into whether pledges are being made to potential students from China that are inconsistent with university policies.

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 3:00am

Although women are being appointed as medical school deans in larger numbers than was true two decades ago, they remain dramatically underrepresented in the schools' top jobs, served at less-prestigious institutions, and have far shorter tenures in the jobs, according to a study to be published in the August issue of Academic Medicine. The study finds that women were 15 percent of the deans appointed between 2000 and 2006, but were only 7 percent of all appointees over all from 1980 through 2006. Men were twice as likely as women to serve at highly ranked medical schools, and female deans had an average tenure of just three years, compared to 5.4 years for men.

Thursday, June 28, 2012 - 3:00am

A panel of experts has released recommendations on how college teams can minimize the dangers of sudden deaths of players during conditioning exercises. The recommendations follow number of deaths during practices. Coaches are urged, among other things, to use gradual increases in demands on athletes so they can acclimate themselves to the physical demands, to introduce new activities gradually, and not to use conditioning exercises as punishments.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 3:00am

A group of companies and higher ed groups on Tuesday announced a project aimed at expanding Internet capabilities at rural colleges and universities across the country. The project, called AIR.U., would increase the broadband available to those institutions and their neighbors by harnessing the unused frequencies, called "white space," of defunct television channels. The partners in the deal, which include Microsoft, Google, the New America Foundation and the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (among many others), are billing the project as an altruistic effort to "[upgrade] broadband offerings in those communities that, because of their educational mission, have greater than average demand but often, because of their rural or small town location, have below average broadband." The first networks are expected to come online early next year.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 4:25am

A California judge on Tuesday ordered the University of California to reveal the names of police officers cited (critically) in a report about last year's incident of pepper spraying at the Davis campus, The Los Angeles Times reported. That newspaper and The Sacramento Bee sued for access to the names (which were redacted in the report) under the state's open-records law, which the judge agreed applied to the information. The university says that it would be willing to release the full report, but the union that represents the police officers is expected to appeal Tuesday's ruling.

 

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 3:00am

Lou van den Dries, a mathematics professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been fined $500 by the state for skipping ethics training that is required of all state employees, the Associated Press reported. He also has now taken the training. Given that Illinois has two former governors behind bars, many professors have said that forcing them to take ethics training is a waste of time. But the law requires it of all employees. In 2007, van den Dries wrote of the requirement: "It is Big Brother reducing us to the status of children. Symptoms: monitoring of the test taking, the 'award' of a diploma for passing the test. It betrays a totalitarian urge on those in power to infantilize the rest of us."

Wednesday, June 27, 2012 - 3:00am

New research by professors at the University of Bristol suggests that biologists may be avoiding scientific papers that have extensive mathematical detail, Times Higher Education reported. The Bristol researchers studied the number of citations to 600 evolutionary biology papers published in 1998. They found that the most "maths-heavy" papers were cited by others half as much as other papers. Each additional math equation appears to reduce the odds of a paper being cited. Tim Fawcett, a co-author of the paper, told Times Higher Education, "I think this is potentially something that could be a problem for all areas of science where there is a tight link between the theoretical mathematical models and experiment."

 

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