Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Dean Goldberg of Mount Saint Mary College reveals how political campaigns came to rely so heavily on television commercials. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

 
Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 4:22am

The Symbiosis University, in Pune, India, has postponed a seminar and the screening of a film on Kashmir amid protests by nationalist Indian students that the programs were "anti-national," BBC News reported. A university spokesman said that the program had been intended as an "apolitical and academic event."

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

Parents can have an impact on the drinking habits of freshmen who are otherwise at high risk of abusing alcohol, according to a study from researchers at Pennsylvania State University. The study compared the impact of parental and peer interventions. The researchers found that non-drinkers who receiving information from their parents before enrolling were significantly less likely than others to become heavy drinkers. The impact of parental and peer interventions was the same in terms of helping a heavy drinker become a less heavy drinker.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

An education analyst and former assistant Education Secretary who became famous for an about-face on No Child Left Behind warned college presidents Monday that changes similar to the 2001 higher education law were coming to higher education. Diane Ravitch, a professor of education at New York University, spoke to the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities, criticized many trends in higher education policy and President Obama's new plan to increase college affordability. An increasing reliance on productivity and outcomes data will result in a generation of students who cannot learn or think for themselves, she warned. "The more we attempt to quantify what cannot be quantified, the more we narrow the purposes of higher education," Ravitch said, calling on college presidents to stand up for academic freedom and resist the "accountability juggernaut." Her remarks were met with a standing ovation — but only from part of the audience, and some did not clap at all.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

Applications to British universities fell by 8.7 percent this year, with applications from England down 10 percent, Times Higher Education reported. The drop comes amid numerous controversial reforms -- and higher tuition rates -- at most institutions. Officials pledged to study the data in detail to determine whether certain groups were opting not to apply.

 

Tuesday, January 31, 2012 - 3:00am

Six years after the University of Alabama sued a local artist over his use of images of the storied Crimson Tide football team in his paintings, the institution and Daniel Moore remain locked in a court battle, The New York Times reported. The university's 2005 lawsuit, which the Alabama Appeals Court is due to hear on Thursday, sought to bar Moore from selling his paintings of current and former Alabama players and coaches without a license from the university. A lower court backed Moore's free speech arguments, over Alabama's arguments (and those of its licensing company) that the artist is infringing its trademarks. Moore has also painted scenes involving teams from the University of Tennessee and other Southeastern Conference institutions.

Monday, January 30, 2012 - 3:00am

Students and professors at California State University at Northridge are frustrated by strict limits on enrollments this semester, with most students barred from enrolling in more than 15 credits and most faculty members barred from letting any of their courses exceed enrollment limits, The Los Angeles Times reported. The reason for the tight enforcement of such rules? Northridge enrolled several thousand students beyond its cap (and beyond funding levels provided by the state) in the fall, and so the system is threatening to withhold $7 million if the campus doesn't bring enrollment down this semester.

 

Monday, January 30, 2012 - 3:00am

The Princeton University Art Museum has returned six works of art to Italy, in the latest of a series of agreements between Italian authorities and museums over archaeological finds that were removed from Italy under questionable circumstances. The agreement specifically stipulates that Princeton acted in good faith and owned the works at the time of transfer. In many of the disputes, museums purchased or were given works that appeared to be legitimate for sale or donation. The objects returned are: a pair of female statuettes; four fragments of a red-figure calyx krater; fragments of an architectural relief; a pithos in white-on-red style; and a group of fragmentary architectural revetments.

Monday, January 30, 2012 - 3:00am

With longstanding tensions rising between the wealthiest and most powerful programs and all other Division I members, the National Collegiate Athletic Association plans to study how its top division is governed, with an eye toward further separating the biggest programs from others, President Mark Emmert told USA Today. The biggest and richest programs have long dominated NCAA decision making, often getting their way on major decisions because of a veiled threat that they might break away from the rest and take their value to television networks with them. But the major programs' disproportionate power was memorialized when Division I abandoned its one-institution, one-vote form of democratic governance in favor of a representative system more than a decade ago.

Tensions have flared at various times when the larger and richer programs have sought rules changes that smaller programs either cannot afford or do not support, and at this month's NCAA convention, opponents blocked adoption of proposals to increase the value and length of athletics scholarships. In comments to USA Today Sunday, Emmert said the new panel would examine how Division I makes decisions, and unidentified officials cited by the newspaper said the association would consider some further subdivision of members in how they govern their programs, but not in who they compete against.

Monday, January 30, 2012 - 3:00am

Tih-Fen Ting, professor in environmental studies at the University of Illinois at Springfield, resigned as chair of the Senate at the campus on Friday, after being linked to an e-mail scandal, The News-Gazette reported. Ting was found to have sent numerous e-mail messages from faculty leaders (which they assumed were not being shared with administrators) with the chief of staff of the president of the university system. That chief of staff has since resigned amid a report suggesting she sent anonymous e-mail messages to faculty leaders, seeking to influence their stands on various issues.

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