Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

July 19, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Brad Bushman of Ohio State University reveals the connection between first person shooter video games and real-world marksmanship. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

July 19, 2012

The National Labor Relations Board has found that Columbia College Chicago violated federal laws by refusing to bargain with the part-time faculty union at the college and hand over information requested by them. In a ruling Tuesday, Robert Ringler, an administrative law judge, ordered the college to bargain in good faith with the union and to provide back pay to part-time faculty members in the department of humanities, history & social sciences affected by a 2010 decision to reschedule classes. The Part-Time Faculty Association at the college, also known as P-fac, is affiliated with the National Education Association. Diana Vallera, P-fac’s president, called the decision a victory for part-time faculty members. “In this case, Judge Ringler has ruled that Columbia College not only mistreated its faculty but also violated federal labor law,” she said.

July 19, 2012

Mountain State University, stripped of accreditation by its regional agency, has decided not to enroll any new students in the fall, institution officials said in a document explaining the situation to students. The Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools said this month that it would end the West Virginia private college's accreditation, citing serious financial and management troubles. Most colleges have great difficulty operating without accreditation, which opens the door to students' receiving federal financial aid, and Mountain State officials have until Monday to appeal, which they have said they would do.

University officials have been working with students to help them explore options should they choose to leave Mountain State. In addition to not enrolling any new students, the university said, "new students who have already signed up for classes in the fall will be dropped from their classes."

July 19, 2012

On many campuses, the administrator's career path might go from being a dean to becoming provost. Stanford University on Wednesday announced for the second time in two years that it was filling a dean's job with a provost. Last year, Stanford named Claude Steele (then provost at Columbia University) to become education dean. On Wednesday, Stanford named Lloyd B. Minor (provost at Johns Hopkins University) as its next medical school dean.

July 19, 2012

The University of Louisville law school planned to offer $550,000 in aid to the students enrolling in the fall, but ended up offering $1.3 million -- creating a $2.4 million deficit over the next three years since the aid packages were for a full law school education, The Courier-Journal reported. The university will fulfill the aid promises, and will cut aid next year if money cannot be raised for the pledges made to new students. The law school's admissions director resigned on Monday.

July 18, 2012

A state panel on Tuesday found that the University of Illinois violated state law by awarding a $4.6 million contract for work on the Urbana-Champaign campus to an architectural firm partly owned by the husband of the administrator who oversees campus planning projects, The Chicago Tribune reported. The state panel expressed frustration both over the contract and the failure of the university to promptly inform the board of the agreement. The matter now goes to the state's inspector general.

 

July 18, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Joe MacGregor of the University of Texas at Austin explains the mechanics of the fracturing currently plaguing the ice sheet of Antarctica. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

July 18, 2012

The U.S. agency charged with overseeing the student visa system has inadequate processes in place to investigate, identify and combat fraud, the Government Accountability Office said in a report to Congress Tuesday. GAO said that U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, which manages the Student and Exchange Visitor Program, has not done enough to ensure that 10,000 schools and colleges that enrolled a total of 850,000 foreign students as of January have done so legitimately.

"SEVP does not have processes to (1) evaluate prior and suspected cases of school noncompliance and fraud and (2) obtain and assess information from ... field offices on school investigations and outreach events," the GAO report said. "Without a process to analyze risks, it will be difficult for ICE to provide reasonable assurance that it is addressing high-risk vulnerabilities and minimizing noncompliance." The report notes that the Department of Homeland Security, of which ICE is a part, concurred with its recommendations, which focused on strengthening its procedures.

July 18, 2012

A special board that oversees Israeli higher education on the West Bank on Tuesday granted university status to the Ariel University Center, Haaretz reported. The action overruled the decision this month of the body that typically would recommend on granting university status, and which opted not to. University status for Ariel has been championed by advocates of Israeli settlements on the West Bank, but has been denounced by many Israeli academics. Some argue that their country doesn't have enough money for its existing universities. Others fear that granting Ariel university status involves using higher education to promote a more permanent Israeli presence in occupied territories.

 

July 18, 2012

Brown University on Tuesday announced that it was removing the name of the late Joe Paterno, an alumnus, from an award the university gives to the outstanding male freshman athlete. The university said the decision was based on the report last week that faulted Paterno and other senior Penn State officials for failing to report Jerry Sandusky to authorities promptly upon receiving reports of his conduct.

 

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