Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 4:21am

Rick Santorum has returned to the issue of higher education. Appearing in Wisconsin Monday, he charged that "seven or eight of the California system of universities don't even teach an American history course. It's not even available to be taught." (Think Progress, a liberal organization, noted the statement, and also posted video of it.) One problem with Santorum's claim is that it's not true. The only University of California campus without American history is the system's medical and health professions campus. In fact, the University of California requires undergraduates to study American history. There is also no shortage of history courses (although some sections appear to be at capacity) at California State University campuses. At California State University at Chico, for example, this semester alone one can find courses being taught in United States history (several sections plus honors sections), America in the 1960s, post-1877 American history, the American Indian, Mexican heritage in the United States, the history of California, America's Vietnam experience, and the history of U.S. foreign policy. Other Cal State campuses appear to have similar offerings.

 

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Antoinette Maniatty of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute explains how a better understanding of metal fatigue can increase safety and profitability in the aviation industry. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 4:26am

Digital artists who work for movie studies are furious about a new collaboration between Digital Domain -- a company that does digital work for many major movies -- and Florida State University, The Los Angeles Times reported. A new Digital Domain Institute will provide a three-year program of training in the industry (while students also complete bachelor's degrees at Florida State). During their time at the institute (for which students will pay tuition) they will have the chance to volunteer for Digital Domain assignments. While supporters say that the new program will offer students valuable experience, those who currently get paid for such work have a different perspective. One blogger wrote: '"A major [visual effects] company is now turning the routinely accepted practice of free labor into a major part of its business plan."

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 3:00am

When the University of Kansas won the 2008 national title in men’s basketball, classes were called off for a day of revelry. Same thing happened when the Jayhawks won the 1988 championship. But this time, as Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little made clear last week in an e-mail to campus, that Tuesday-morning anthropology lecture was happening whether Kansas won or lost its Monday night game against the University of Kentucky. “I believe that our first mission as a university is to foster academic success and that is accomplished in part by setting high expectations for our students,” she wrote. “A national title would be worthy of celebration, but we are confident those celebrations can take place without disrupting KU's academic mission.” She also encouraged students to celebrate safely, and offered the campus arena as a venue to watch the game.

Kentucky President Eli Capilouto expressed similar sentiments in a message to his campus. A spokeswoman said a big game has never been cause to call off classes -- students were in lecture halls the day after national titles in 1996 and 1998.

Elsewhere, the practice of canceling class time to celebrate athletics has drawn criticism. When the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa canceled classes after winning the football championship this year, the Faculty Senate protested. But perhaps a protest is inevitable. In 1952, the Lawrence Journal-World reports, Kansas students marched on the chancellor's house demanding a day off after the college's first basketball championship. (He said no.) Following in those footsteps, an online petition by Kansas students calls celebratory off days a “university tradition” and had more than 725 signatures Monday afternoon.

One student told the campus newspaper he supported the chancellor's decision, but wasn't sure he'd be attending class Tuesday. "I will make a game-time decision," he said.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 4:28am

Since 2008, California State University has settled seven cases brought by whistle-blowers who brought charges of wrongdoing to the attention of superiors, and said that they were subsequently punished for doing so, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. The story focuses on Justin Schwartz, a lecturer at Cal State East Bay who reported that a colleague in the recreation department spent university funds to buy himself a $4,000 bike, gym passes and sailing equipment. The campus investigation confirmed the allegations. Schwartz is now out of a job (the university says that's because of budget cuts). The man he accused is still employed.

 

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 3:00am

The Australian government today unveiled a new website designed to give would-be applicants (domestically and internationally) to the country's 39 public universities information about everything from their fees, faculty credentials and student graduation outcomes to their child-care services and campus pubs, The Sydney Morning Herald reported. Federal officials (sounding like their American counterparts) said they hoped the transparency provided by MyUniversity would "help drive universities to lift performance and quality." Campus officials told the newspaper (privately) that they are skeptical.

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 4:34am

Israel's Council for Higher Education is expected to soon adopt a new rule that all of those named as university presidents must be professors, Haaretz reported. The move follows a controversy over the selection of a non-academic to be president of the University of Haifa. The new rule is not expected to be retroactive, so it would not invalidate the selection at Haifa.

 

Tuesday, April 3, 2012 - 3:00am

Employers expect to hire 10.2 percent more new college graduates in 2012 than they did in 2011, the National Association of Colleges and Employers said in its spring outlook on Monday. That's slightly higher than the 9.5 percent increase that the employers projected when surveyed last fall, suggesting that their view of the economy is continuing to brighten. The job numbers are of increasing relevance to college officials as they seek to respond to growing concerns about recession-fueled student debt and to public pressure on them to report their job placement rates.

Monday, April 2, 2012 - 4:41am

Research and development expenditures at Johns Hopkins University topped $2 billion in the 2010 fiscal year, according to data released last week by the National Science Foundation. Hopkins has led the list for decades because of federal support of its Applied Physics Laboratory. Of the $61.2 billion in R&D expenditures at universities, $21.5 billion in spending takes place at the top 25 universities, and just over $60 billion in activity takes place at doctoral institutions. Public institutions account for $41.2 billion in spending. Following Hopkins are: University of Michigan at Ann Arbor ($1.2 billion), University of Wisconsin at Madison ($1 billion), University of Washington at Seattle ($1 billion), and Duke University ($983 million).

 

 

 

 

Monday, April 2, 2012 - 3:00am

Anna Maria College has withdrawn its invitation to Victoria Reggie Kennedy to be the institution's commencement speaker, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette reported. The college, a Roman Catholic institution, cited the objections of the Rev. Robert J. McManus, the bishop of Worcester. Bishop McManus said he wouldn't attend the graduation ceremony with Kennedy present because of her views in favor of legal rights to abortion, gay marriage and contraception. Kennedy issued a statement in which she said: "I have not met Bishop McManus, nor has he been willing to meet with me to discuss his objections. He has not consulted with my pastor to learn more about me or my faith. Yet by objecting to my appearance at Anna Maria College, he has made a judgment about my worthiness as a Catholic. This is a sad day for me and an even sadder one for the church."

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