Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, October 11, 2011 - 3:00am

With many parts of the country experiencing a wave of anti-tax politics, many community colleges are being especially careful about proposals that would raise local taxes. The Grand Rapids Press reported that Grand Rapids Community College is studying the possibility of going for a tax increase by promising that none of the new revenue would support faculty salaries or pay. In past votes, anti-tax groups have criticized faculty pay (which administrators say is high when factoring in funds professors earn on top of base salary -- a view contested by faculty leaders). So the college may frame the tax increase in a way such that it could not contribute to faculty compensation.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Islamists stormed the University of Sousse, in Tunisia, on Saturday as tensions escalated over the university's refusal to enroll a woman who wears a full face veil, Reuters reported. After the incident, security forces surrounded the faculty building to prevent further attacks.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

West Virginia University on Friday asked reporters to avoid calling studies by its faculty members "WVU research," The Charleston Gazette reported. Many colleges and universities routinely urge reporters to cover research by their faculty members, and to link the findings to the institution involved. A statement from the university said that it was trying to clarify only that the university does not take a stand on research -- except to defend professors' rights to explore ideas. But the newspaper noted that the clarification followed a series of public health studies by the university's researchers that have been heavily criticized by the coal industry, an influential force in West Virginia.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The 2011 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics will be awarded this morning. This site will be updated when information is available.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Ed Koch, the former mayor of New York City, is having a public fight with New York University, where he earned his law degree. The New York Times reported that Koch demanded that the NYU's law school distribute a rebuttal to a report that is highly critical of some of the U.S. government's prosecutions of terror suspects. NYU says that anyone is welcome to criticize the report, but that the university cannot selectively involve itself in critiquing controversial work by its faculty members. Koch told the Times: "Academic freedom doesn’t mean you have the right to distribute false reports, and when called to your attention, to do nothing about it. The dean doesn’t seem to care whether it’s factual or not."

But John Beckman, an NYU spokesman said: "We live in a society where there are lots of institutions that speak with a single voice. That is not how a university works. We provide a forum for a lot of different views, including controversial views. So when an outsider sees something with which he or she disagrees and says, 'Condemn that point of view,' that is the exact opposite of what we are about."

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Michael Berkowitz, who formerly was director of enrollment at the University of Phoenix, is facing murder charges in Colorado, The Colorado Springs Gazette reported. Authorities say that he ordered his bodyguard to kill a man Berkowitz believed had sold him dirt, rather than drugs. Berkowitz's lawyers maintain that the bodyguard is responsible for the death, and that a back condition led Berkowitz to become addicted to heroin, setting off the chain of events that led to the killing in which Berkowitz is charged.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The president and the dean of instructional services at Bishop State Community College, in Alabama, have doctorates from unaccredited institutions, The Press-Register reported. James Lowe, the president, lists on his résumé a doctorate from San Francisco Technical University. Latitia McCane holds a doctorate from Lacrosse University. The Council for Higher Education Accreditation said that neither university had ever been accredited by a recognized agency. Both officials said that they worked hard for their doctorates. State education officials in 2008 adopted a policy barring the recognition of doctorates from institutions not recognized by one of the regional accreditors, but the chancellor of postsecondary education said that Lowe and McCane were "grandfathered" because they earned their degrees before the policy was adopted.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Calvin Chen of Mount Holyoke College explains the Italian fashion industry’s increasing reliance on factories owned and operated by Chinese emigrants. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

Thomas J. Sargent and Christopher A. Sims were named this morning as winners of the 2011 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics. There were honored "for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy."

Sargent is the William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Business at New York University. Sims is the Harold H. Helm '20 Professor of Economics and Banking at Princeton University.

Monday, October 10, 2011 - 3:00am

The Pyongyang University of Science and Technology, which is one year old, is holding its first international scientific conference, and the event is renewing the debate about the institution, The Washington Post reported. The university is a private institution with faculty members trained in the West and financial support from evangelical Christians -- all very unusual characteristics for a university in North Korea. Proponents see the university as a sign of progress. But critics worry that it helps North Korea's government.

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