Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

January 27, 2014

The last week saw multiple campus shootings, some fatal. On Friday, a student at South Carolina State University was shot and killed, and authorities on Saturday arrested a man, saying that the two were arguing before the shooting, CNN reported. On Saturday, a man whose identity has not been released was shot in the parking lot of Los Angeles Valley College, CBS Los Angles reported. Earlier in the week, a Purdue University student was charged in murdering a fellow student. And at Widener University, a student was injured after being shot on Monday, The Delaware County Daily Times reported.



January 24, 2014

The University of Michigan Board of Regents today named Mark S. Schlissel as the institution's next president. Schlissel is provost of Brown University. Before being named provost at Brown in 2011, he was dean of biological sciences at the University of California at Berkeley, where he also held the C.H. Li Chair in Biochemistry.

He will succeed Mary Sue Coleman on July 1. Coleman is retiring after 12 years as president at Michigan.


January 24, 2014

In today’s Academic Minute, Thomas Sawicki of American Public University describes the discovery of a number of new species in the subterranean caves of Florida. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.


January 24, 2014

The parents of an Auburn University student who was kidnapped on campus in 2008 have filed a claim alleging that her murder could have been prevented if the institution had its own police force, which it eliminated in the 2000s to save money. Since then, Auburn has relied on city police to patrol campus, the Atlanta-Journal Constitution reported. Lauren Burk's parents also allege that the university failed to follow federal security recommendations. They are suing the Alabama Board of Adjustment for $1 million in damages; the state's constitution protects state entities (including Auburn) from lawsuits seeking monetary damages. An Auburn spokesman reached for comment said, "It is Auburn University’s policy not to comment on pending investigative issues."

January 24, 2014

The number of federal direct student loan borrowers who were enrolled in an income-based repayment program rose by 20 percent in the last three months of 2013, as the Education Department launched a large outreach campaign to get more people to use the benefit.

Slightly more than 1.3 million borrowers had loans in an income-based repayment plan at the end of last December, an increase of 210,000 from the end of September, according to recently released federal data.

The increased participation in the program occurred as the Obama administration in November and December sent emails directly to more than 3.5 million borrowers that it believed could benefit from enrolling in the plans, which cap loan payments at a percentage of a borrower’s discretionary income and forgive any outstanding balance after 20 or 25 years.

During the same period, the number of borrowers participating in the similar but less generous income-contingent program remained roughly the same at 580,000.

Despite efforts by the Obama administration to better publicize and ease the application process for the income-based repayment program, enrollment remains relatively low compared to the overall federal direct loan portfolio, which includes 11.7 million people who are currently actively repaying their federal direct loans. An additional 5.5 million are in deferment or forbearance, and another 2.4 million direct loan borrowers are in default.

The Education and Treasury Departments planned to announce on Friday another aspect of the administration's campaign to enroll more borrowers in the programs. TurboTax will display a banner on its website that links to the Education Department's "repayment estimator," which provides information on enrolling in the programs.

The government will also include, during the upcoming tax season, a message about federal student loan repayment options on the envelopes of tax refund checks mailed this year. About 25 million of those envelopes will be mailed to tax filers this year, the departments said. 

January 24, 2014

Facing enrollment declines, Iowa Wesleyan College plans to close about half of its academic programs and to shrink its faculty, The Gazette reported. The jobs of  22 of 52 professors and 23 of 78 staff members will be eliminated. The college will also eliminate 16 of 32 major programs, including studio art, sociology, history, philosophy of religion, communication and mass communication, and forensic science.

January 24, 2014

The Education Department has again rescheduled its “technical symposium” on the Obama administration’s proposed college ratings system. The new date for the daylong, public meeting is February 6, according to an email sent Thursday to presenters.

Education Department officials, citing poor weather conditions in Washington, D.C., earlier this week postponed the event and set February 20 as the new date. But, according to emails to speakers, officials have since decided they want to hold the conference sooner.  

The symposium will feature presentations from more than a dozen people with expertise in higher education data who will make presentations on various aspects of the department’s proposal to develop a ratings system.   

January 24, 2014

Brandeis University announced Thursday that it paid Jehuda Reinharz, its former president, $4.9 million this month. The funds were due to Reinharz for deferred compensation and sabbaticals that he did not take during his presidency, a Brandeis statement said. The university has been under intense criticism from many students and faculty members over high payments to Reinharz. The university also announced new policies on executive compensation, including a faculty role on panels that review executive compensation and a commitment to release information on executive compensation before it is required. The university statement noted that in revealing the large payments made in January, before such information would be public on tax forms, Brandeis was moving toward the kind of transparency it has pledged to provide.



January 24, 2014

A Chilean university affiliated with the for-profit education company Laureate International Universities has lost its final bid to appeal the revocation of its institutional accreditation. The university reported on its website that the National Education Council has rejected its final appeal, a decision that means that new students will be ineligible for government-backed loans.

In deciding not to renew the Universidad de Las Américas' accreditation in October, the National Accreditation Commission cited the 34,000-student university’s unsatisfactory graduation rates and its rapid enrollment growth: while the number of students rose by 36 percent over three years, the increase in instructors failed to keep pace. The commission also raised concerns about the finances of the university, finding that while spending on academic salaries was low, the amount spent on leases and educational and administrative services provided by companies related to Laureate was substantial. Under Chilean law universities must be nonprofit but they may be affiliated with for-profit entities like Laureate that they contract with for services. 

UDLA plans to reapply for institutional accreditation but must wait two years before doing so.

“For more than 25 years, UDLA has played a significant role in expanding access to quality higher education for tens of thousands of students who would otherwise not have had the opportunity to pursue a university degree,” Laureate said in a statement. “As institutional accreditation is voluntary in Chile, this ruling will not stop UDLA from continuing to provide its students with strong academic and career-oriented programs."

January 24, 2014

Arizona State University on Thursday revoked its recognition of a fraternity that held a racially themed party on the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. While some defenders of the members of Tau Kappa Epsilon had argued that they should not be punished for what they described as protected speech, Arizona State administrators cited several university policies that the fraternity had violated, including rules governing alcohol consumption and distribution, off-campus conduct that potentially threatened the safety of the campus, and engaging in discriminatory activity. The statement said that university officials were still investigating whether individual students should be punished under Arizona State's student code of conduct for the party, which featured the students dressed in stereotypical hip-hop clothes and drinking out of watermelon cups.


Back to Top