Higher Education Quick Takes

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Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

A federal trial begins this week on what could be a key legal case for Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. The case involves a suit against Quinnipiac University over a move to eliminate its women's volleyball team. The university has denied wrongdoing. The suit charges that the university counts its men's and women's rosters in ways to create a false impression of relative gender equity. One of the issues in contention, as the Associated Press reported, is whether the university can count its "competitive cheer squad" as an athletic team.

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

If you are worried that state legislators are making huge cuts to education programs without recognizing the consequences or taking responsibility, this video on The Huffington Post of an interview with an Arizona state senator won't comfort you. But if you are worried about the state of student journalism, you might be encouraged by the tough, informed questions about cuts in vocational and technical education.

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

After months of refusing to answer questions about access to a talk by Sarah Palin, California State University at Stanislaus has announced that reporters will be allowed to cover the event, the Associated Press reported. The appearance -- a fund raiser for the university foundation -- has been criticized for the selection of a divisive speaker, her high speaking fees, and secrecy over plans.

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

A new international affairs institute in Canada is the focus of a debate over academic freedom. The Globe and Mail reported that concerns have grown since the ouster of Ramesh Thakur, formerly vice rector of United Nations University, as the first director of the Balsillie School of International Affairs. The school is affiliated with the University of Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier University, and a private think tank founded by Jim Balsillie, an entrepreneur. The concerns focus on the control that the think tank has over appointments at the university-affiliated international affairs center. Thakur, in an e-mail to the Globe and Mail, said: "Academic freedom is the bedrock of the university, and autonomy from outside interests (however well-meaning) is important in protecting that academic freedom.”

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

Harvard University's medical school, suffering from its endowment decline, has negotiated a deal in which hospitals with which it works will provide $36 million for operations over the next three years, The Boston Globe reported. Harvard's medical school has been unusual in being able to rely largely on endowment income and research grants, but that is no longer viable. As part of the negotiations for the funds, the hospitals asked for speedier decisions on matters involving their doctors and for detailed information about the medical school's finances.

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

Bangladesh's University of Engineering and Technology closed indefinitely Sunday following student riots calling for time off to watch World Cup games, AFP reported. Five people were injured in the riots; many more were injured in similar riots during the last World Cup

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

Errol Davis, chancellor of the University System of Georgia, left the board of BP just days before the disaster that has created chaos for the Gulf region and the company. The Atlanta Business Chronicle reported that he has been named in four current lawsuits by company shareholders.

Monday, June 21, 2010 - 3:00am

  • Ron Dorn, vice president for administration and finance at Minot State University, in North Dakota, has been chosen as vice president for resource management at North Idaho College.
  • Wendy deProphetis Driscoll, assistant professor of chemistry at Wagner College, in New York, has been promoted to associate professor of chemistry there.
  • Jett M. (Jay) Fisher, executive director of Associated Alumni at Sewanee -- University of the South, has been promoted to vice president for university relations there.
  • Megan Gillick, senior director of development for intercollegiate athletics and associate campaign director at Oregon State University, has been appointed vice president for advancement at Loyola University Maryland.
  • Kent Kalm, visiting professor in the department of health and exercise science at Gustavus Adolphus College, in Minnesota, has been named assistant professor in the department of health and exercise science there.
  • David Lynch, vice president of external relations at Graduate Leverage, in Massachusetts, has been chosen as regional director of the northeast United States at the National Student Clearinghouse.
  • F. Charles Mace, professor of school psychology at the University of Southern Maine, has been appointed Unicorn Children's Foundation Endowed Chair and executive director of the Autism Institute at Nova Southeastern University.
  • Mark Zafereo, assistant director of external relations at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, has been appointed senior director of university advancement at the University of Houston Victoria.
  • The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Friday, June 18, 2010 - 3:00am

    Stanley Ikenberry, who returned to his old job as president of the University of Illinois when when institution found itself between presidents due to a scandal over politically influenced admissions decisions, has called off a plan by the university to honor him with a $100,000 statute, the Chicago Tribune reported. Plans for the statue were set and an artist selected, but when the Tribune started looking into the statue, Ikenberry killed the project. The university is facing deep budget cuts and a spokesman said that Ikenberry "didn't want to generate any ill will toward the university or put the university in an embarrassing situation."

    Friday, June 18, 2010 - 3:00am

    Athletes at the University of San Francisco spent thousands of dollars designated for textbooks on other expenditures, one of several violations that led the National Collegiate Athletic Association to place the university on two years' probation Thursday. The case, which was adjudicated through the NCAA's summary disposition process, also involved 535 long-distance phone calls that athletes were inappropriately allowed to make free, and a finding that the university failed to monitor its sports program adequately. USF agreed to donate $28,000 -- about double the value of the violations -- to charity as part of its penalty.

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