Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

January 2, 2014

The Common Application, which had severe technological problems in the early fall, but which has seen a more stable system recently, was able to process more applications on December 31 (the day of the year at which it typically receives the largest number of applications) than it did a year ago on the same day. But late on New Year's Day and continuing for a few hours, many of those filing were unable to do so.

Prior to the New Year's Day difficulties, social media featured only scattered complaints about slow response time, or difficulty with certain parts of the process, but most comments were simply from students boasting about being done with applications.

Rob Killion, executive director of the Common Application, said via email that the system processed 154,904 applications on Tuesday (9 percent more than the previous year), and  165,128 recommendation forms (a 42 percent increase). Counting optional writing supplements that were filed, he said that the total amounted to 5.23 submissions per second all day long. Another 122,00 applications were filed New Year's Day. He said that the volume of inquiries at the support desk has been "relatively light." Through Jan. 1, the total number of applications filed is up 12 percent, to more than 2.5 million.

Some of those filing late on New Year's Day did have difficulties. According to a post by Common Application on its Facebook page Thursday morning, the problem is now solved, but social media posts indicate it was fairly traumatic for some applicants who thought they were about to miss deadlines. The Common Application post says: "Between 11:35 p.m. Eastern and 2:35 a.m. Eastern some users had difficulty using the system, particularly during the first of those three hours. However, since 2:35 Eastern (50 minutes ago) you should be able to work without a problem. Have no fear - all member colleges with a January 1 deadline will accept any application submitted promptly today. Sorry to keep you up a little later tonight!"

 

 

January 2, 2014

An investigation by Bloomberg has found that there have been a total of 60 fraternity-related deaths since 2005, and that 9 of those deaths have been at events linked to a single fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Colleges have suspended or closed at least 15 chapters in the past three years, and have disciplined more than 100 chapters since 2007. The article by Bloomberg also details hazing practices, describing an eight-week initiation at Salisbury University, for example, in which a pledge alleged and the university confirmed that fraternity members "forced pledges to drink until they almost passed out and dressed them in women’s clothing and diapers.... Fraternity members confined recruits for as long as nine hours in a dark basement without food, water or a bathroom, while blasting the same German rock song at ear-splitting volume."

Frank Ginocchio, SAE’s general counsel, told Bloomberg that the the deaths linked to events at the fraternity reflected a "perfect storm," not a problem with the organization. “We try, and we keep on trying,” Ginocchio said. “I don’t think our procedures, our rules and risk management are much different from any other fraternity. We’ve all had some bad cases and sad occurrences.” The fraternity says that it does not tolerate hazing.

 

January 2, 2014

The proportion of faculty members who work part time fell slightly in 2012 from the previous year, although it remained close to half, according to data published this week by the National Center for Education Statistics. The Education Department report, which also includes statistics on fall 2012 enrollments and graduation rates, among other things, shows that of the 1,565,493 postsecondary faculty members employed in fall 2012 by institutions that award federal student aid, 800,212, or 51.2 percent, were employed full time, and 765,280 worked part time. In fall 2011, 784,639 were full time and 780,865 were part time.

January 2, 2014

A new study in Academic Medicine notes the differing career options being used by men and women on medical school faculties -- at a time that women making up an increasing share of medical school students. Of traditional tenure track programs (in which professors engage in teaching, research and patient care) only 20 percent of medical schools report that there are more women than men in this category. But of medical schools offering a clinician-educator track (in which faculty focus only on patient care and teaching), 77 percent report having more women than men. A key issue, however, is that those on the tenure track are more likely than those on the clinician track to be promoted, the study finds.

 

December 30, 2013

The American Council on Education's president, Molly Corbett Broad, has issued a statement strongly condemning the movement to boycott Israeli universities. “In recent weeks, several scholarly associations have voted on formal motions to boycott activities involving faculty and staff at Israeli academic institutions. Such actions are misguided and greatly troubling, as they strike at the heart of academic freedom," Broad's statement says. "Many of these same scholars would decry efforts by trustees, governors or state legislators to infringe on faculty teaching and research activities at their own institutions, and yet these boycotts involve more sweeping repercussions, impeding global academic relationships and the constructive exchange of ideas among countries and cultures. One could easily see such boycotts moving to other countries and scholarly pursuits, which would only lead to a further erosion of academic freedom and free thought in a world that is so desperate for it.



"

 

December 28, 2013

In the last decade, new federal regulations have forced academics who receive money from drug companies to disclose those ties when writing and speaking about their products. An article in The New York Times suggests that such conflicts of interest may have been going on for some time -- undisclosed -- involving academics who defend controversial Wall Street trading practices. A number of such academics do work for parts of Wall Street, or their academic programs receive gifts from businesses that benefit from the research. In many cases, the Times said, these ties have not been reported. Professors told the newspaper that their views were not influenced by the ties to the finance industry.

December 28, 2013

The Los Angeles Times conducted a survey of public and private high schools in Southern California to see which colleges and how many colleges recruited, and found that the schools with high proportions of low-income and minority students received far fewer visits. At one private high school, the research found, there were more visits by colleges this fall (113) than there were high school seniors (106). The colleges included top institutions from all over the country. At a Los Angeles public high school with 280 seniors, only eight recruiters (all local) visited.

 

 

December 27, 2013

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau has informed ITT Educational Services that the federal agency's enforcement office may urge the CFPB to "take legal action" against the for-profit higher education provider for possible violations of federal law, ITT announced in a federal tax filing Friday. In its statement, ITT, which operates more than 140 ITT Technical Institutes in 38 states, said that the consumer bureau had notified it about the potential legal action on Dec. 23. The agency's notice said its enforcement staff plans to allege that the company violated the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, the Truth in Lending Act, and other financial regulations, and that the staff "expects to recommend seeking remedies and penalties to the fullest extent of the law."

ITT officials said that they would respond to the agency's notice and that they believe the company's "acts and practices relating to the matters under investigation are lawful."

December 25, 2013

Israel's High Court of Justice on Tuesday upheld the decision of government authorities to upgrade a higher education campus on the West Bank to full status as an Israeli university, The Jerusalem Post reported. The presidents of the nation's other universities objected to the procedures used to upgrade Ariel University, as the institution is known, and the court rejected those arguments, saying that proper procedures had been followed. A major objection the university leaders (but not the focus of the legal fight) is their view that the country does not have enough money to support a new university. Ariel has been championed by those who support Israeli settlements on the West Bank. Many Israeli academics have opposed the granting of university status, saying that it is wrong to build up Israeli institutions on the West Bank, and that doing so will likely encourage the movement in other countries to boycott Israeli academe.

 

December 25, 2013

The arrest of a university vice president in China was announced Wednesday in the latest sign that higher education has become a new target of the government's anti-corruption campaign, Reuters reported. The official arrested was Chu Jian, vice president of Zhejiang University. He was charged with "suspected economic problems," which Reuters said is a term used for corruption. He could not be reached for comment. A week ago, an investigation was announced into the work of a vice president of Sichuan University, and officials have also said that they are investigating the official in charge of admissions at Renmin University.

 

Pages

Back to Top