Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 13, 2012

The California State University System is considering a series of fees that would be "incentives" for students to move to graduation in a timely way. Students would be required to pay extra for retaking courses, or those who have accumulated so many credits that they could have graduated. But The Los Angeles Times reported that student groups say that the plan is flawed, and incorrectly assumes that students aren't working as hard as they can to finish their degrees. A survey released by a student group says that the proposed fees are likely to force students to borrow more, not help them graduate on time.

 

November 13, 2012

Presidents of community colleges received annual raises of roughly 4 to 6 percent per year between 2006 and 2012, according to a newly-released survey of executive compensation from the American Association of Community Colleges. The presidents' median base salary was $167,000. The association's study also found that three-quarters of respondents plan to retire within the next decade.

November 12, 2012

Don Haussler, an adjunct at Kansas City Kansas Community College, is a popular math instructor who needs a hip replacement. As The Wyandotte Daily News reported, he doesn't have health insurance and can't afford the operation. So students have organized a series of fund-raisers in a "Hip for Haussler" campaign.

 

November 12, 2012

Donald Grady, police chief at Northern Illinois University, has been suspended from his job and banned from the police department, following a statement from a state judge about an investigation into a police officer, The Chicago Tribune reported. The judge found that the Northern Illinois department withheld key evidence that could have cleared an officer accused of sexually assaulting a student. The evidence was interviews with students who said that the alleged victim told them the sex she had with the officer had been consensual. Grady on Friday referred questions to the university administration.

November 12, 2012

A feature in The New York Times explores Liberty University's ambition to rise to the top ranks of college football. University officials believe that much as the University of Notre Dame used football to become a focus of pride for Roman Catholics (most of whom have no direct tie to the institution), Liberty could do the same for evangelical Protestants. A key obstacle: Liberty's conduct rules (an alcohol ban on and off campus, for instance) may make recruiting difficult. Another caution: Liberty made a similar push to replicate Notre Dame's model in the late 1980s, hiring a former coach of the Cleveland Browns to lead its teams. The effort did not take off.

 

November 12, 2012

Peter Gray resigned last week as associate director of athletic student services and director of academic advising and counseling at the University of Iowa after an investigation found that he had traded football tickets for sexual favors and had inappropriately touched some athletes, The Press-Citizen of Iowa City reported. University officials declined to comment and Gray could not be reached for comment.

November 12, 2012

Marquess Wilson, a star receiver on Washington State University's football team, said Saturday that he is quitting the team because of "physical, emotional and verbal abuse" by the coaching staff of Mike Leach, The Seattle Times reported. Wilson said he opted to quit because of coaches who "belittle, intimidate and humiliate us." The athletics director at the university, Bill Moos, issued a statement Saturday night, saying he had tried to offer "additional guidance if [Wilson] was willing to meet the standards that have been set by Mike Leach and his staff in their effort to establish a competitive football program at Washington State. Unfortunately, during times of coaching transitions, departures are not uncommon." On Sunday, Elson Floyd, president of the university, issued this statement: "After consultation with WSU Athletic Director Bill Moos, I have asked our athletic department to fully review recent allegations raised concerning the football program and report their findings and conclusions as soon as possible. Simultaneously, I have asked the Pac-12 to independently do the same. Together, both reports should get to the bottom of the matter."

November 12, 2012

Higher education officials in Colorado and Washington State, both of which voted last week to legalize marijuana use, say that the legal changes won't affect campus pot bans, USA Today reported. Officials cite federal laws that require colleges receiving federal funds to ban drug use on campus, and say that they have no plans to change their rules. "If someone thinks they are going to walk around campus smoking a joint, it's not going to happen," said a University of Washington spokesman. "While it may be legal two blocks off campus, it will be illegal under federal law, so it will be illegal on campus."

November 12, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Nicholas Lynchard of the State University of New York at Ulster reveals why the elderly are better at recalling positive information. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 12, 2012

Green Mountain College announced Sunday that it has euthanized one of the two oxen that have worked for many years on the college's farm. Its announcement that it was going to euthanize both oxen (oxen tend to work in pairs) when one was injured set off widespread criticism by animal rights activists who were particularly angered by plans to use meat from the oxen in the campus dining hall. College officials said that using the oxen meat would be consistent with the sustainable principles of the institution. The college has been unable to carry out its plan because slaughterhouses in the area have received threats linked to the plans. The college decided to euthanize the ox who was injured, and will continue to care for the other one. Because of medication the ox has received in recent weeks, its meat would not be suitable for human consumption, so the animal will be buried.

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