Higher Education Quick Takes

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Wednesday, November 3, 2010 - 3:00am

Arizona State University is considering a plan that would end state support for its law school, but allow the law school to be free of much state regulation, including that related to tuition rates, The Arizona Republic reported. The move follows a similar plan being considered for the business school of the University of California at Los Angeles.

Wednesday, November 3, 2010 - 3:00am
  • Steven Berenson, associate professor of law at Thomas Jefferson School of Law, has been promoted to full professor there.
  • Kerri Briggs, state superintendent for education for Washington, D.C., has been named program director of education reform at the George W. Bush Institute.
  • Dave Marcus, former education reporter at Newsday, has been chosen as director of media and public relations at New York Institute of Technology.
  • Michael Sanseviro, interim dean of student success at Kennesaw State University, has been selected for the job on a permanent basis.
  • Susan Sutton, associate vice president of international programs for the Indiana University System and associate vice chancellor at Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis, has been appointed senior adviser for international initiatives at Bryn Mawr College.
  • The appointments above are drawn from The Lists on Inside Higher Ed, which also includes a comprehensive catalog of upcoming events in higher education. To submit job changes or calendar items, please click here.

    Tuesday, November 2, 2010 - 3:00am

    The Medical College of Georgia and a foundation created to support it have ended their rift, The Augusta Chronicle reported. The college cut ties to the foundation two years ago, but has now worked out an arrangement in which the foundation will focus on alumni fund-raising and a new fund-raising arm created by the college will focus on the institution's needs.

    Tuesday, November 2, 2010 - 3:00am

    Some Chinese students are organizing a class action against the Educational Testing Service following its decision to cancel scores on the Graduate Record Examination given in China last month, People's Daily reported. Last week, ETS officials said that they were offering test-takers the option of retaking the test or getting a refund, but the People's Daily article says that many test-takers don't think that enough. ETS said it was forced to take this action because major portions of the test had already been given in previous administrations of the GRE. "Most candidates believe it is not fair for them to have to accept the consequences caused by the mistakes of ETS," the article says. "Some believe that since there were not many candidates who systematically reviewed the original questions, the number of re-examination questions should be reduced or the score of candidates should be counted by combining the scores of the re-examination and the previous examination." A spokesman for ETS told Inside Higher Ed that "students are understandably upset but we are really doing everything in our power to minimize the impact by offering students options, contacting them with information via e-mail and text messaging, establishing a toll-free number notifying universities, providing reimbursements for travel expenses from the 10/23 administration and so forth. We'll see what happens in the future."

    Tuesday, November 2, 2010 - 3:00am

    The University of Texas at Austin has been boasting of late of its raids on the University of California's furlough-weary faculty. But The Contra Costa Times reports on how the University of California at Berkeley won back a couple that it lost to Austin just a year ago. Jennifer Johnson-Hanks and William Hanks, a sociologist and an anthropologist, respectively, cited family ties to the Bay Area and the effort by a Berkeley dean who lured them back.

    Monday, November 1, 2010 - 3:00am

    Many of Latin America's universities are experiencing renewed investment and are reaching out for more ties to academe in the rest of the world, Times Higher Education reported. Not only are governments putting more money into higher education -- most notably Brazil, in scientific fields -- but Latin American academic leaders are placing more of a priority on partnerships with universities elsewhere, Times Higher said.

    Monday, November 1, 2010 - 3:00am

    A Kaplan University recruiting manual for admissions officials dealing with veterans who might enroll suggests creating “fear, uncertainty, doubt” about competing colleges, according to an investigation by Bloomberg News, which obtained a copy of the manual. The article discusses how a disabled veteran of the war in Iraq was pressured to enroll by telling him that his spot might be lost to another student -- even though the program for which he was being recruited was online and didn't have any capacity limit. The veteran -- who says the university kicked him out when his federal grant didn't materialize and he couldn't afford tuition -- also says he was told that he could trust Kaplan because it is owned by The Washington Post Company.

    A spokeswoman for Kaplan said that the university's approach is to help veterans who may be overlooked by others in higher education. Melissa Mack, the spokeswoman, told Bloomberg: “Active-duty military personnel and veterans are often under-served by traditional institutions.... Kaplan has received significant interest from veterans because of our military-friendly practices.”

    Monday, November 1, 2010 - 3:00am

    Authorities suspect that an Ohio State University law student stole more than 200 books from the law library and sold or tried to sell them online, bringing in more than $10,000, The Columbus Dispatch reported. The student, who has not been identified, has posted online listings to sell more than 1,000 books. He was discovered when a Brazilian lawyer who bought a book reported to Ohio State that her new purchase had a crossed-out Ohio State ink stamp.

    Monday, November 1, 2010 - 3:00am

    Photo: Bernardo Guzman
    We can't be sure, but we think this sign spotted by a friend of Inside Higher Ed at the Rally to Restore Sanity may have come from an academic.
    Monday, November 1, 2010 - 3:00am

    The University of Iowa has admitted to violating National Collegiate Athletic Association recruiting rules in part by allowing two basketball recruits to meet Ashton Kutcher and Demi Moore at a football game, The Des Moines Register reported. Kutcher is considered a representative of the university's athletic interests, so the high school students should not have been introduced to him.

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