Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

The leaders of the University and College Union, the primary faculty union in Britain, are backing the right of students to wear burqas, The Independent reported. Union leaders argue that this right will assure that the universities are welcoming to people of all faiths.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

A local district attorney has criticized Marquette University for its handling of two allegations of sexual assault by athletes in which the D.A. has now determined that it cannot go ahead with prosecution, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. In one case, the accused athlete had a meeting with coaching staff before authorities were notified that the allegations had been made. In both cases, delays from when the university learned of the allegations to when the police learned of them hindered efforts to build a case, officials said. Stephanie Quade, Marquette's dean of students, issued a statement following the criticism: "We're not proud of these incidents or the way in which they were handled. There have been some blunt and direct conversations with offices throughout the university, and we're working on ways to address the issues that have been raised."

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Spending on "529" savings plans for college is up 75 percent in the last two years, the Los Angeles Times reported. The state-sponsored plans provide tax breaks for contributions to various investment funds. The article attributed the surge to continued concern among families about college costs, but also to renewed confidence in the possibility of making money through investments.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Government officials in Togo have shut the University of Lome, the country's largest university, following student protests, the Associated Press reported. Students have been demanding better food and reconsideration of a new curriculum for which they say they are not prepared.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011 - 3:00am

Jim Tressel resigned as Ohio State University's football coach on Monday, ending weeks of steadily mounting pressure on both him and the university in the wake of revelations that Tressel failed to act despite knowing that players had violated National Collegiate Athletic Association rules. Ohio State announced in March that it had suspended and fined Tressel for failing to tell administrators or the NCAA that players had sold team memorabilia and received free tattoos worth thousands of dollars. Although Tressel's two-game suspension grew to five to equal the penalty the NCAA imposed on players, Ohio State had come under increasing pressure to dismiss the coach for his role in the embarrassing scandal. And it appears that it was about to get much worse for Tressel, as Sports Illustrated reports that it had informed Ohio State officials Saturday of a pending investigation showing that the violations at Ohio State were much broader and went on for much longer than the university has acknowledged. In a videotaped statement Monday, Gene Smith, the athletics director, said that Tressel had emerged from a discussion between the two Sunday night persuaded that resigning was in his and Ohio State's best interests.

Friday, May 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Two members of Congress -- Representative Ed Markey, a Massachusetts Democrat, and Representative Joe Barton, a Texas Republican -- are asking the College Board and ACT for more information about the policies they have to protect the privacy of those who take the SAT or ACT, Bloomberg reported. The lawmakers note that the associations not only collect names of test-takers, but also sell the names to colleges seeking potential applicants. Officials of the two testing companies said that they hadn't received the information requests, and so couldn't comment on them.

Friday, May 27, 2011 - 3:00am

The British Columbia Human Rights Tribunal this week upheld the right of the University of Victoria to evict a man who had been living in a campus apartment for 20 years, long after he graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1997, The Vancouver Sun reported. Alkis Gerd'son, the long-term resident, had argued that the university had no right to evict him because he has a mental disability, but the tribunal rejected his argument.

Friday, May 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Senator Tom Coburn, an Oklahoma Republican known for his efforts to limit federal spending, on Thursday issued a report attacking the National Science Foundation for "waste, fraud, duplication and mismanagement." The report details various grants (mostly in the social sciences) that Coburn finds hard to justify. A statement from Coburn said that the NSF plays a role in key discoveries but that much of its spending "contributes to our debt rather than science." Coburn is a long-time critic of social science research at the NSF -- in 2009, he tried without success to ban political science research from receiving NSF support. An NSF statement about the report said: "The National Science Foundation is renowned for its gold-standard approach to peer review of each of the more than 40,000 proposals it receives each year, While no agency is without flaws, NSF has been diligent about addressing concerns from members of Congress about workforce and grant management issues, and NSF's excellent record of tracking down waste and prosecuting wrongdoing is apparent from Senator Coburn's report. We believe that no other funding agency in the world comes close to NSF for giving taxpayers the best return on their investment."

Friday, May 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Many students and faculty members at Tsinghua University, in China, have been stunned to find that "the No. 4 Teaching Building" has been renamed for a corporate supporter, Xinhua reported. The building is now called "Jeanswest Building" after a clothing company. Officials noted that Jeanswest had helped the university financially, but some on campus are saying that the university is "selling itself."

Friday, May 27, 2011 - 3:00am

Yale University announced Thursday that the Reserve Officers Training Corps would be returning to the institution, with a Naval ROTC unit. Yale's new unit will be the only Navy ROTC program in Connecticut and will welcome participants from other colleges in the state. Yale is the latest elite college to invite ROTC back to campus in the wake of the authorization by Congress of the end to military discrimination against gay people.

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