Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 23, 2013

Many admissions officers at the annual meeting of the National Association for College Admission Counseling were complaining about technical glitches on the Common Application's new back-end system, which was launched in August. Some applicants have complained of difficulties in inputting their materials, while some colleges have had difficulties pulling applicant information from the system. Sessions featuring Common Application officials had lots of angry admissions officials in attendance. Many other enrollment officials, who didn't go to the sessions, saw the glitches as typical for major system overhauls -- and not that disruptive (assuming they are fixed soon).

Rob Killion, executive director of the Common Application, said that the system is already setting records in the number of applications being processed. He acknowledged that some bugs remain but said that he anticipated them being fixed "in a week or so." Here is the Common Application's status list of bugs.

September 23, 2013

Athletes took to national television to protest their treatment by the National Collegiate Athletic Association by wearing wrist tape with "APU" -- "All Players United" -- during their football games Saturday. Players from the University of Georgia, Georgia Tech and Northwestern University joined in to draw attention to issues including concussions and lack of pay. Ramogi Huma, president of the National College Players Association, told ESPN that the players have been planning for months and athletes on other elite teams are interested in participating in the protest, which will continue "throughout the season."

September 23, 2013

Don Samuelson, a professor of veterinary medicine at the University of Florida, has been charged by authorities with digital voyeurism for using a camera pen to secretly record the body parts of several of his female students, The Gainesville Sun reported. A police report said that Samuelson confessed, and said he made the videos of women's chests and thighs for his own enjoyment.

September 23, 2013

George Washington University removed from its sexual assault policy the two-year statute of limitations for filing formal complaints with the university, a spokeswoman confirmed Thursday. The GW Hatchet reported that student government leaders had protested the policy. Some universities enforce such statutes to encourage quicker reporting, but since the U.S. Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights started cracking down on sexual assault issues in 2011, some colleges have opted to eliminate or extend theirs.

September 20, 2013

Jerry C. Lee, who over 24 years at National University built a growing system of nonprofit colleges serving adults, is retiring. Lee was president of National University from 1989 to 2007 and has since 2001 been chancellor of the evolving National University System, which in recent years has added John F. Kennedy University and City University of Seattle to its stable of work-force-oriented institutions.

September 20, 2013

Harvard University is set to announce a major fund-raising campaign on Saturday, ending years of speculation about when the campaign would go public, and how much it would seek. Bloomberg reported. The figure of $6 billion, about which there was speculation several years ago, would no longer be record-setting, since Stanford University completed a $6.2 billion campaign last year and the University of Southern California is in a $6 billion campaign. A hint of the potential size of the campaign, as reported in Harvard Magazine, is speculation that the goal for the business school alone could reach $1 billion.

 

September 20, 2013

A $120 million gift from a Canadian business executive could help expand the Rhodes Scholarships, The Globe and Mail reported. The scholarships currently go to those in the British Commonwealth, the U.S. and Germany, and the gift could lead to an expansion to also include other countries.

 

September 20, 2013

The U.S. Education Department fined Dominican College in New York $200,000 for failing to comply with federal crime reporting mandates under the Clery Act. According to the settlement agreement, the college failed to “properly define its campus and report crime statistics for non-campus property; distribute the Annual Security Report (ASR) as required by the Clery Act; include required policy statements in the ASR; and maintain an accurate and complete daily crime log.”

(Note: The above paragraph has been updated from an earlier version to correct the fine amount.)

A Dominican spokeswoman, Erin DeWard, said the fine stems from a 2009 mistake in which officials listed incorrect crime statistics in the student handbook. Rather than updating the material to reflect the most recent numbers, Dominican re-printed old statistics from a year prior. In 2009, the college was ordered to pay $20,000 to the state of New York and make reforms to its crime reporting system, after an investigation by New York Attorney General Andrew Cuomo found that the handbook misstated crime statistics over the course of several years.

September 20, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Emma Versteegh of the University of Reading explains how earthworms create a chalky record of the climate. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

September 20, 2013

The American Public University System, which consists of the Charles Town, W.Va.-based American Public University and American Military University, announced on Thursday it will allow its students to earn academic credit by taking massive open online courses. The 10 science, technology and mathematics courses -- five each from MOOC providers Coursera and Udacity -- have received credit recommendations from the American Council on Education. In a statement, the university said it may expand its offerings and incorporate more MOOC providers in the future.

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