Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 15, 2014

Police at the College of Marin, in California, are investigating 23 people who are suspected of pretending to be students to obtain federal student aid, The San Francisco Chronicle reported. Their plot reportedly involved plans to obtain $200,000, and some of the funds have already been paid out.

 

September 15, 2014

The University of Sydney has agreed to the demands of authorities from Sri Lanka that the university withdraw invitation to two human rights activists from Sri Lanka to a conference on human rights in Asia that the university is organizing in Bangkok, The Guardian reported. The conference is being organized with the University of Colombo and Sri Lankan officials will attend and speak. Human rights groups are criticizing the decision, but University of Sydney officials say that they remain supportive of academic freedom.

 

September 15, 2014

The University of Missouri system will pay nearly half a million dollars to the National Center for Higher Education Risk Management for consulting services to help create policies and training regarding Title IX. NCHERM is charging a flat fee of $495,000 for one year of its services, according to the Columbia Daily Tribune. The consulting began in July. Brett Sokolow, president of NCHERM, said that the contract is “among the biggest contracts” the center has.

September 15, 2014

In today's Academic Minute, Amanda Kibler, a professor of English education at the University of Virginia, chronicles the evolving nature of language and learning in this global age. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

September 12, 2014

Cornell University and the City of Ithaca have settled a lawsuit filed by the father of a freshman who killed himself in 2010, The Ithaca Journal reported. The father's suit charged that Cornell and Ithaca failed to take adequate steps in the design of a bridge from which the student jumped to his death. (Numerous changes to bridges around Cornell's campus have been made since then.) Under the settlement, Ithaca will pay $100,000 and Cornell will establish a permanent scholarship in the student's name. Ithaca objected to the settlement and said it was being forced into it by its insurance provider.

September 12, 2014

Some are questioning the plan put forward by the University of Oregon board chair for the search for the next president, The Register-Guard reported. The board chair has put forward a plan in which he will conduct the search with an "assist" committee. The board chair alone will be allowed to rank and eliminate finalists before presentation to the full board.

 

September 12, 2014

Robert G. Templin Jr., the longtime president of Northern Virginia Community College and one of the nation's most prominent two-year chiefs, has announced that he will retire from college in February 2015. After stepping down Templin will work part-time as a senior fellow at the Aspen Institute's College Excellence Program. In recent years Aspen has studied the performance of community colleges and awarded a $1 million prize for excellence every two years.

September 12, 2014

Two professors in Canada faced physical attacks this week by students or ex-students. CBC News reported that a student walked into her former instructor's office at the University of Toronto and attacked him with a kitchen knife. The professor was cut but held off the student. At Red River College, in Manitoba, a former student was charged with knocking down and punching an instructor, The Winnipeg Free Press reported.

 

September 12, 2014

In today's Academic Minute, Susan Meschwitz, assistant professor of chemistry at Salve Regina University, explains the health benefits of honey. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

September 11, 2014

The University of South Carolina Upstate, under legislative pressure, in April called off a planned appearance by a lesbian humorist. This week Wofford College, a private liberal arts institution in South Carolina, held the performance banned at South Carolina Upstate, an appearance by Leigh Hendrix of her one-woman show “How to be a Lesbian in 10 Days or Less.” The appearance was organized by Mark Ferguson, chair of the department of theater, who said it was important to support academic and artistic freedom that had been squelched at a neighboring public institution. Of the cancellation, he said, that "for my colleagues and me, it was an excruciating embarrassment for the state of South Carolina.”

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