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Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

A psychologist at the University of Texas at Arlington was the "intended target" in the shooting death of her husband by one of her former student clients, The Dallas Morning News reported. The former student shot and killed himself after killing the psychologist's husband. Authorities said that they came to the conclusion about the shooter's motive based on something they found in in his vehicle, but they declined to say what that was.

Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

Antioch College, which is being revived after its original version was shut down by Antioch University, announced a key advance on Friday: The chancellor of the Ohio Board of Regents has authorized Antioch to award bachelor's degrees. That state approval is crucial to the new Antioch obtaining accreditation.

Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

The University of California system is debating the idea of charging different tuition rates at different campuses, The Los Angeles Times reported. Proponents say that the idea can bring in badly needed revenue, and is realistic, given that there is much greater demand to enroll at some campuses (Berkeley, for example) than others. Critics see the idea undercutting the unity of the system.

Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

Students at the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee early Saturday morning ended a protest in which they had occupied a study room in the student union nonstop for 67 days, The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported. The students have been protesting Governor Scott Walker's budget plans, which include legislation to deny collective bargaining rights to many state workers. The students attended class during the protests, but kept at least one person in the study room, in which they also slept and ate. Police had to escort some of the protesters out of the room, but none of them resisted.

Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

The Technion is suing Google, claiming that the company has a responsibility to shut down a blog that is highly critical of a program at the Israeli university, Haaretz reported. The blog is on one of Google's blog-hosting sites. Google declined to comment, but is contesting the suit in an Israeli court. The blog in question is devoted to attacking the quality of a medical school program at the Technion for Americans. The blog claims that the program is a poor choice for American students, and the Technion says that the blog is spreading slander.

Monday, May 9, 2011 - 3:00am

Academic professionals in Illinois are worried that legislation under consideration would move classification of their jobs from their universities to a state civil service commission, The News-Gazette reported. The academic professionals -- and university administrators too -- say that universities are better able to determine the qualifications needed for various jobs.

Friday, May 6, 2011 - 3:00am

About 25 adjunct faculty members at Ferris State University in Michigan held a sit-in in the university president's office for about two and a half hours Thursday afternoon before being asked to leave by police. The faculty members, part of the school's newly formed adjunct union, have argued that administrators have been intractable in negotiations and have been unwilling to address issues such as job security and benefits. The university's administration claims that the union is being unrealistic by using the adjunct union's contract at the University of Michigan as their model. At the time of the sit-in, the university's president was not on campus.

Friday, May 6, 2011 - 3:00am

A federal jury has awarded $1.1 million to a former history professor at Madison Area Technical College, finding that he lost his position for complaining about religious discrimination, The Wisconsin State Journal reported. Michael Dubin reported comments that denigrated Judaism. A lawyer for the college said that the institution did not violate the law, and that Dubin's contract was not renewed because of his job performance.

Friday, May 6, 2011 - 3:00am

Graduate teaching and research assistants at Polytechnic Institute of New York University on Thursday filed a petition with the National Labor Relations Board seeking union representation. The petition would create a distinct bargaining unit for the approximately 600 assistants who work at the institute, which merged with NYU in 2008. While wages, job security and health insurance were mentioned as concerns, the chief issue cited was lab safety, according to a statement released by the United Auto Workers, with which many graduate student unions are affiliated.

Efforts to organize graduate students at NYU have encountered a rocky road, and this latest bid to unionize looks as though it will meet similar resistance at NYU-Poly. Reiterating previous arguments made by NYU, Kathleen Hamilton, a spokeswoman for NYU-Poly, cited precedent established by the NLRB, which held that graduate, teaching and research assistants at private universities are students, not employees. "We admitted these men and women as students; we didn’t hire them as employees," she said in a statement. "So we don’t think unionization and collective bargaining is the right framework for a relationship between a university and its graduate students." (The UAW is also trying to organize teaching assistants at the main campus of NYU -- and has filed for an election of that unit. The university is opposing the move.)

Different iterations of the NLRB have ruled on the matter in different ways. In 2000, the NLRB held that NYU's graduate assistants were employees, which opened the door to NYU's graduate students to collectively bargain. Unions for graduate students are more common at public institutions, where teaching and research assistants are among the 45,000 higher education employees unionized by the UAW. In 2004, another version of the NLRB overturned the original 2000 ruling. NYU graduate students called strikes in 2005 and 2006 in an unsuccessful effort to force NYU to continue to recognize the union.

Friday, May 6, 2011 - 3:00am

The former director of financial aid at Ave Maria College was awarded more than $400,000 by a Michigan jury Wednesday in her suit charging that she lost her job for cooperating with a federal investigation into possible financial aid violations at the institution, The Detroit News reported. The college argued that her position was eliminated for reasons unrelated to her whistleblowing.

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