Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

September 14, 2012

Today Inside Higher Ed introduces a new feature: a monthly contest in which we ask readers to suggest a caption for our higher ed-themed cartoons, drawn by Matthew Henry Hall. The first cartoon is here, as are the rules. We encourage your participation -- there are opportunities not just to propose pithy and clever captions yourself, but to endorse (and eventually vote on) those you like. And the contest winner will receive a signed version of the cartoon and a $100 gift certificate to Amazon.

We welcome your participation -- click here to have at it.

September 14, 2012

As participation in higher education worldwide rises and geographic barriers and boundaries fall, collaboration on some postsecondary issues has increased. But most countries and regions still operate independently on many fronts, both purposefully (because countries want to go their own way) and less so, because of inadequate communication and cooperation. That fragmentation can be particularly vexing in areas such as quality assurance, and it is a major reason for a new endeavor announced Thursday by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

Through the new CHEA International Quality Group, the council -- which represents American colleges and universities that are accredited by agencies that it recognizes -- aims to bring together colleges, accreditors, quality assurance agencies and associations from around the world to work together on dealing with quality-related issues in higher education. CHEA itself has been active in international matters, setting aside part of its annual meeting for an international forum and working with entities such as the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and UNESCO on issues such as diploma mills.

But Judith S. Eaton, CHEA's president, said council officials believed that the "growth in worldwide activity of our institutions, through study abroad and branch campuses, and the expanding international activity of U.S. accreditors" -- as well as the explosion of issues such as cross-border education, for-profit higher education, and massive open online courses -- made this a logical time to expand its involvement. The council does not plan either to accredit institutions or to recognize international quality assurance agencies as it does U.S. accreditors.

"We're trying to create a forum in which we and our partners around the world can work together on quality assurance issues," she said. The new entity, which will be part of CHEA, plans to convene discussions, conduct research, share news and best practices, and provide consulting services on quality assurance issues.

September 14, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Larisa DeSantis of Vanderbilt University explains the evolutionary strategy that allowed mammals to survive multiple shifts in the Earth’s climate. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

September 14, 2012

Pepperdine University has denied the request of a student for academic credit for an internship with the Marijuana Policy Project, which encourages states to liberalize medical marijuana laws and to decriminalize possession of small amounts of pot. The project issued a press release criticizing the decision and saying that it was inconsistent with Pepperdine's Christian values. "Many prominent religious leaders and organizations support marijuana policy reform, along the spectrum of medical marijuana, decriminalization, and taxation and regulation. Seemingly, the Christian message is, or should be, one of mercy, humanity, and stopping the nation’s failed war on marijuana users," said the statement. A spokesman for Pepperdine said that the student was free on her own time to work with the group, but that the university reviews requests for academic credit to be awarded for internships. In this case, he said, officials "determined that the mission of Pepperdine didn't align well enough with the organization she applied to for the internship."

 

September 13, 2012

Recent developments in online higher education will likely benefit the credit ratings of brand-name and niche institutions while possibly threatening for-profit institutions and smaller, regional colleges and universities, according to a new report by Moody's Investor Service. In a report that elides the potential implications of massive open online courses (MOOCs) and the continued growth of conventional online programs, Moody's analysts predicted that well-reputed institutions will band together around online offerings to reduce operating costs. Meanwhile, there could "eventually be negative side effects on for-profit education companies and some smaller not-for-profit colleges that may be left out of emerging high reputation online networks," the report said. However, the analysts suggested that well-known institutions that rush too heedlessly into MOOCs could sacrifice their reputational footing. "[T]he rapid pace of the MOOC movement presents the possibility of brand dilution as universities rush to join the trend without controlling the quality of the product/content being posted," they wrote.

September 13, 2012

The University of Tulsa on Wednesday night fired Geoffrey Orsak as president, a position he had held for only 74 days, The Tulsa World reported. The day before, the university announced that Orsak was taking a leave to care for his seriously ill father. But the announcement Wednesday did not say why the president was dismissed. In his own statement, Orsak said, "I am very disappointed given the lengthy due diligence process for the position that within such a short period of time the board has decided to go in a different direction." Previously, Orsak had been dean of engineering at Southern Methodist University.

September 13, 2012

The winners of the 2012 McGraw Prize in Education include a prominent innovator in non-credit online education, and a journalist. The winners are:

  • John Merrow, an education reporter for National Public Radio and "NewsHour" and president of Learning Matters.
  • Sal Khan, who created the Khan Academy, which provides free online videos on a huge range of education topics.
  • Two leaders of TNTP -- CEO Ariela Rozman and President Timothy Daly -- whose organization helps to produce and retain top teachers.
September 13, 2012

Concordia University-St. Paul announced Wednesday that it was dropping its undergraduate tuition and fees by a third for next year, joining a handful of institutions including the University of the South and the University of Charleston to cut their sticker price in the face of increased price sensitivity in the market. The sticker price for tuition and fees, currently set at $29,700, will be $19,700 next fall for all students, including those currently enrolled.

Administrators at Concordia said they were becoming concerned that students their traditional demographic -- middle- and lower-income students in Minnesota -- were ruling out Concordia as an option based on its price, despite the fact that after aid few students actually ended up paying that much. According to federal data, 99 percent of students at Concordia received some form of institutional aid.

Much of the student population at Concordia currently pays less than the new sticker price. The college's discount rate was 48 percent, meaning that students paid just over 50 percent of the sticker price on average. Concordia administrators said some revenue is likely to be lost by lowering the price, but that they hope to offset that by increasing enrollment.

September 13, 2012

Last fall, Occupy Student Debt, an activist group, called on students to stop paying their student loan bills as a form of protest. Now another group has called for burning those bills on Sept. 22, promising a 20-foot high "ceremonial fire" in Hollywood. Hard Block, a group that supports the goals of the Occupy movement and describes itself as a "developer and enabler of the burgeoning protest culture," has organized the event and says that an "elected official" will dump the ashes of the student loan bills on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives.

It's unclear how successful the protest will be: Occupy Student Debt promised that students would stop repaying their bills if 1 million students signed on. So far, just over 4,000 have.

September 13, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Richard Lankau of the University of Georgia reveals how some native plants are responding to an ecological shift caused by invasive species. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.
 

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