Higher Education Quick Takes

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Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 3:00am

The government of Ontario on Monday announced plans to provide funds to create 60,000 additional slots in higher education over the next five years. That growth will follow the creation of 75,000 slots between 2003 and this year.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 3:00am

Although Loyola University in New Orleans has been calling its teams "Wolfpack" for more than 50 years, North Carolina State University has insisted that the institution stop doing so, or pay a licensing fee, The News & Observer reported. North Carolina State says that it has legal trademark rights that bar others from using the name. Loyola officials have been talking to North Carolina State about a possible resolution of the dispute. The Maroon, Loyola's student newspaper, on Monday ran an editorial saying that it was "ridiculous" for North Carolina State to claim, as it has, that Loyola's use of Wolfpack could result in confusion between the two institutions. "Loyola is a private Jesuit liberal arts institution with an undergraduate population of less than 3,000. NC State, on the other hand, is a public research institution with over 23,000 undergrads," the editorial says. "Athletics are a similar study in contrasts. NC State is a NCAA Division I school and part of the Atlantic Coast Conference, sporting 24 varsity teams. Loyola, in comparison, is a NAIA Division I school in the Southern States Atlantic Conference, with a mere 10 sports teams (including men's and women's teams). Can one believably say that they purchased Loyola Wolfpack basketball tickets in the mistaken belief that they were buying NC State Wolfpack basketball tickets? The probability seems low."

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, Pepperdine University's Dyron Daughrity discusses the deep historical roots of Egypt’s Christian minority and their role in recent political events. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 3:00am

Pearson and the Columbia University School of Continuing Education are today announcing a deal in which the university will offer a series of courses using Pearson's online learning platform. The courses will include a hybrid master of science program in information and knowledge strategy and an online business certificate program.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011 - 3:00am

An op-ed in the student newspaper decrying "illegal babies" (born in the United States to those lacking U.S. citizenship) has set off debate and protest at Rollins College. The essay in The Sandspur is illustrated with an image of an alien (as from outer space) and opens as follows: "How would you feel if a stranger broke into your home, began to eat your food, wear your clothes and watch your television? I am assuming you would not be the slightest bit welcoming to this intruder. Your home and all its contents were purchased with the finances you strenuously worked to obtain. Under the 14th Amendment, birthright citizenship allows a pregnant foreigner to waltz right over our borders, have a baby, and the baby receives the benefits of being an American citizen."

The Orlando Sentinel reported that more than 200 people turned out to discuss and critique the op-ed, many of them angry that it had been published. Jamie Prizzi, the freshman who wrote it, said she's bothered by all the criticism, but stands by what she wrote.

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 3:00am

In today’s Academic Minute, David Cortright of the University of Notre Dame provides some context for understanding U.S. and U.N. intervention in Libya. Find out more about the Academic Minute here.

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 3:00am

New York University late Sunday announced plans to launch a full campus -- described as "a comprehensive research university with a liberal arts and science college" -- in Shanghai. The campus will be the first American university with full, independent authority in China -- a legal status approved by the Ministry of Education. Following the creation of a similar outpost in Abu Dhabi, the new campus is part of NYU's idea of becoming a "global network university." The admissions system for the Shanghai campus will be the first in China to include a range of factors beyond the country's national college admissions test. NYU expects to enroll the first students in the fall of 2013, with half of the students coming from China and half from the rest of the world.

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Peking University's plans to expand a program of consultations with different groups of students is worrying some students and human rights advocates, China Daily reported. The university said the program would focus on reaching out to students who are facing academic difficulty. But the university is also planning sessions with "troublesome students," including those with "radical thoughts" that include criticizing the administration. "No universities or schools have the right to deprive students of the freedom to think or speak," said Xiong Bingqi, deputy director of the Beijing-based 21st Century Education Research Institute. "The university is somewhere to cultivate people's independent personalities and thinking, so it's totally wrong for Peking University to intervene in students' freedom to express their different opinions," Xiong said.

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 3:00am

Lecturers at the University of Washington Extension program, which offers a range of English instruction, have voted to unionize. The new bargaining unit will be affiliated with the American Federation of Teachers.

Monday, March 28, 2011 - 3:00am

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and legislative leaders on Sunday announced a budget deal that appears likely to include significant cuts to the City University of New York and State University of New York systems. Some additional funds were added that will lessen cuts to the the community colleges in both systems and to SUNY hospitals. More details are expected in coming days.

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