Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

June 22, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Susan Trollinger of the University of Dayton examines the growth of tourism in Amish Country and why many of us are fascinated by their way of life. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

June 22, 2012

Mitt Romney continues to be vague about what he would do about President Obama's new policy of not deporting undocumented students who meet certain criteria -- a policy widely praised by education groups. But on Thursday Romney, the Republican presidential candidate this year, proposed an immigration change that is consistent with the proposals of many education groups, and advocates for international graduate students. He proposed that foreign students who obtain advanced degree in math, science or engineering at American universities should be granted permanent residency. Many experts on international education have said that other countries are becoming more competitive in attracting foreign students because of those nations' willingness to keep foreign talent in the country.

 

June 22, 2012

Low productivity and growing demand in the health care sector will lead to millions of new jobs in the next eight years, according to a study -- called Healthcare -- released Thursday by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce. The study, one of several put out by the group about the current and future shape of the employment market and the implications for the education system, identified the following ways higher education will be affected by this growing sector demand:

  • A bachelor's degree will be required for 24 percent of all health care jobs in 2020, up from 21 percent in 2010. The study noted that the demand for postsecondary talent in health care trails only science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields and education occupations.
  • A graduate degree will be required for 28 percent of all health care jobs -- the second-highest proportion of all occupations.
  • Between 1992 and 2008, the proportion of staff nurses with a bachelor's degree increased from 31 percent to 40 percent. This shift toward bachelor's degrees will crowd members of some minority groups out of the nursing profession: Compared to white and Asians Americans, African-American and Hispanic nurses are more likely to have a diploma or associate degree than a bachelor's degree in nursing.
  • There is a strong correlation between socioeconomic status and access to medical school.
  • The medical field remains disproportionately white and Asian, even though access is improving for members of other minority groups.
June 22, 2012

A House appropriations subcommittee this week approved legislation that would cut $14 million from the budget of the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 2013 fiscal year, a reduction of 9.6 percent. The spending bill backed by the Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior, Environment and Related Agencies would provide $132 million to the humanities endowment (and an equivalent amount to the National Endowment for the Arts) in 2013, down from the current $146 million. President Obama proposed that the agency receive $154.3 million in 2013.

June 21, 2012

As more college admissions counselors are seeking specialized training, a newly released paper from the National Association for College Admission Counseling argues that high school college readiness counseling requires standardized training, too. Author Mandy Savitz-Romer wrote that high school college readiness counseling lacks pre- or in-service requirements, or a unified certification or body of knowledge, and she proposed a set of core areas of competency that should be part of a pre-service training program for prospective counselors:

  • Psychological processes associated with college readiness
  • Social environments that affect students’ resources for succeeding in college
  • Microeconomics, especially related to individual decision-making behavior
  • Educational reform policies related to college readiness
  • Higher education research, including college access and enrollment and college choice theories
  • Family engagement models
June 21, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Carey Rappaport of Northeastern University explains the development of a new generation of body scanners that will provide an increase in security and privacy for airline passengers. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

June 21, 2012

Weixing Li, a professor at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln who was detained in China while there with a student group, will be allowed to return to the United States, The Lincoln Journal Star reported. The professor contacted family members to tell them he will be able to leave.

 

June 21, 2012

The commissioners of six major football-playing conferences (plus the University of Notre Dame) reached agreement Wednesday on the framework for a four-team playoff for big-time college football, to begin in 2014, ESPN reported. The plan needs the approval of the college presidents on the committee that oversees the Bowl Championship Series, which is scheduled to meet next week in Washington. Under the proposal, the existing BCS system for choosing a national champion would be replaced as of 2014 by a system in which a committee would choose four teams to play in two semifinal games (based on the current bowl games) leading to a championship game.

June 21, 2012

In a move that has been feared for months, Rutgers University has announced plans for a major construction project that will block access to the parking lot known as home to many of the grease trucks that are popular with students, The Star-Ledger reported. While university officials have pledged to come up with someplace for the trucks to be located, their many fans are worried about any change. "You can’t fault Rutgers for expanding, but when you have something that is known nationally, you don’t want to get rid of that for another astronomy classroom," said D.J. Skopelitis, a former Rutgers graduate student. He was interviewed while he was eating a "Fat Beach" sandwich -- a cheese steak with chicken fingers, mozzarella sticks, lettuce, ketchup and French fries.

 

June 20, 2012

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation on Tuesday announced $9 million in grants for "breakthrough learning models" in higher education:

The awards include:

  • $3.3 million to EDUCAUSE for four winners of the Next Generation Learning Challenges' latest RFP. These winners include state systems, four-year and two-year programs, and all have signed up to deliver significant improvements in completion at scale, at affordable tuition rates.
  • $3 million to MyCollege Foundation to establish a nonprofit college that will blend adaptive online learning solutions with other student services.
  • $1 million to Massachusetts Institute of Technology to develop and offer a new, free prototype computer science online course through edX, a joint venture between MIT and Harvard, and partner with a postsecondary institution that targets low-income young adults to experiment with use of the course in a "flipped classroom."
  • $1 million to the Research Foundation of the City University of New York to support the launch of the New Community College (NCC) at CUNY.
  • $500,000 to University of the People to support the pursuit of accreditation.
  • $450,000 to the League for Innovation in the Community College to develop and pilot a national consortium of leading online two- and four-year colleges that will help increase seat capacity in the community college system and support more low-income young adults in attaining a postsecondary credential. The consortium will initially include Coastline Community College (CA), the University of Massachusetts Online, Pennsylvania State World Campus and the University of Illinois-Springfield.

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