Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

October 7, 2013

Adam Ackley and Azusa Pacific University jointly announced on Friday that he would be leaving his position at the university. Ackley has taught theology at Azusa Pacific for 15 years, and until recently he did so as a woman. When he revealed that he was transgender and had transitioned to become a man, officials at the Christian university questioned whether he could stay. Students and others have rallied around Ackley. The joint statement said: "Dr. Ackley and university leadership have engaged in thoughtful conversations regarding Dr. Ackley’s continued employment at APU and recognized that they have different views on the theology of human sexuality. While we appreciate Dr. Ackley’s past service and pray God’s best for the journey ahead, we have reached a mutual agreement that recognizes it would be best for Dr. Ackley to pursue professional endeavors elsewhere.”

 

October 7, 2013

The Center for Student Opportunity has begun a campaign called "I'm First" that is aimed at first-generation college students. The nonprofit group, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, created a website inspired by Dan Savage's "It Gets Better" videos. The site includes testimonial videos featuring first-generation graduates, as well as tips and guidance about how to navigate college.

October 7, 2013

U.S. News & World Report has announced revisions (downward) of the statistics given by Providence College for the average SAT and ACT scores of the class that entered in fall 2012. The average critical reading score on the SAT was really 569, not the 611 that had been reported. The average mathematics score on the SAT was 580, not the 624 reported. Further, the composite ACT score was 25, not 28. Other SAT and ACT figures reported by Providence (including the 25th and 75th percentile scores) were accurate. The magazine said that correcting the data did not change the college's ranking. A spokesman for the college said that the data errors were simply a mistake by the institution, and that the college identified the error and reported it as soon as it was discovered.

 

October 7, 2013

Yale University police are apparently seeking a “poopetrator,” the Yale Daily News reported, as multiple students in a residence hall have returned to the laundry room to find their clothing soiled in urine, feces and food waste. Also last week, someone hung several items of clothing smeared with feces outside a different residence hall, then apparently notified Daily News reporters via an anonymous e-mail address, the.yale.poopetrator@gmail.com, according to the New Haven Register. The emails were signed "Copro Philiac," presumably referring to coprophilia, an obsession with excrement. A residence hall official told the Register Yale is upping surveillance and security in laundry areas, and police are investigating the incidents. A Yale spokesman declined to comment.

October 7, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, C. David Williams of Harvard University explains how our bodies store and release energy as we move. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

October 7, 2013

Egyptian authorities have released two Canadian professors who have been held for seven weeks, reportedly in terrible conditions, The Globe and Mail reported. The professors were arrested (for reasons that have been unclear) during an anti-government protest. The professors are John Greyson, an associate professor of film at York University, and Tarek Loubani, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Western Ontario. They were planning to travel to Gaza, where Greyson was to explore the possibility of making a documentary and Loubani was involved in a program to train local doctors.

 

October 7, 2013

City Colleges of Chicago have begun construction on the new Malcolm X College and School of Health Sciences. The campus, which will be adjacent to the college's current location, will be 500,000 square feet and have the capacity for an enrollment of 20,000 students. The construction is part of a five-year, $524 million capital improvement campaign at the seven-college system.

October 4, 2013

In today’s Academic Minute, Alicia Melis of the University of Warwick explores the similarities of cooperation between humans and chimpanzees. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

October 4, 2013

The Department of Defense has suspended a program that provides members of the military with money to attend college because of the federal government shutdown. Branches of the armed forces will not authorize tuition assistance for new classes during a government shutdown, a Pentagon official wrote in a blog post this week.

In addition to rejecting new requests for the benefits, the Army said in a statement that it could not process some existing requests that were received before the shutdown began on October 1.

The Department of Veterans Affairs, meanwhile, said it is continuing to process veterans’ education benefits, but that could stop if the shutdown drags on longer than several weeks. The agency has already closed its education call center because of the shutdown. 

October 4, 2013

A University of Alabama assistant strength and conditioning coach was placed on administrative leave for loaning an athlete money in violation of National Collegiate Athletic Association rules, The Tuscaloosa News reported. The football safety, Ha Ha Clinton-Dix, was suspended from the nation’s top football team Wednesday for an unspecified violation of team rules. Corey Harris apparently loaned Clinton-Dix “an amount less than $500” during the summer.

Under the new NCAA enforcement structure, head coach Nick Saban, whose $5.3 million annual salary makes him the highest-paid coach in college football, could be punished for the violation. The new model presumes the head coach responsible for violations committed by his or her staff, unless the coach can overcome that presumption by demonstrating active promotion of an environment of compliance.

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