Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 6, 2012

The executive director of the foundation for Los Angeles Trade-Technical College has resigned, 10 months after being placed on leave in the wake of an audit that raised questions about payments made to her and other possible financial improprieties, the Los Angeles Times reported. Rhea Chung was placed on administrative leave in January, and she defended her record at the foundation in a letter to the chancellor of the Los Angeles Community College District. The county's district attorney is still investigating the possible wrongdoing at the foundation.

November 6, 2012

The U.S. Department of Education is questioning the "financial responsibility" of Corinthian Colleges based on the department's interpretation of the for-profit's estimated intangible assets, according to a corporate filing. If not resolved, the matter could lead to Corinthian losing its eligibility to participate in federal financial aid programs. The company said in a statement that it disagrees with the department's revised take on its assets. Representatives from Corinthian and the department will meet soon to discuss the issue.

November 6, 2012

The Association of American Universities on Monday announced that it had invited Boston University to join its ranks. Membership in the AAU is highly sought by up-and-coming research universities. The last new members was the Georgia Institute of Technology, in 2010. Last year, the AAU lost two members, with Syracuse University leaving voluntarily and the University of Nebraska at Lincoln being kicked out. At that time, AAU leaders said that they didn't want the organization to get too large, and that they wanted to periodically evaluate whether members met the criteria for membership. An AAU spokesman said that no institutions were asked to leave this year.

 

November 6, 2012

The American Association of University Professors has asked for a fuller explanation of the University of San Diego's decision last week to rescind an invitation to Tina Beattie, a British professor asked to be a visiting fellow at the Roman Catholic university, because of her positions on social issues. In a letter to Mary Lyons, the university's president, the group drew parallels with a similar situation four years earlier and said it was "surprised and disappointed" that the issues arose again. "We appreciate that you may have additional information that would contribute to our understanding of the serious issues of academic freedom with which we are concerned. We would therefore welcome your comments," wrote B. Robert Kreiser, the AAUP's associate secretary.

Lyons, in a statement, said that it was Beattie's decision to sign a letter supporting gay marriage as a Catholic theologian that influenced her decision. "I want to emphasize that it was not her teaching or scholarship that prompted me to rescind this invitation," Lyons wrote. "I respect her right, as an academic and a Catholic theologian, to engage in whatever work she deems necessary and important." But she said that those speaking at the university's Center for Catholic Thought and Culture should support "both the mission of the center and the Catholic character of our university," and she believed Beattie's public dissent from the church was at odds with those goals.

November 6, 2012

Smith College will mark Election Day (and remind students to vote) by serving food items associated with presidents. On the menu today: New England clam chowder (a favorite of President Kennedy), mini ballpark franks (inspired by the time President Franklin D. Roosevelt served them to British royalty), and jelly beans (President Reagan's favorite snack). President Obama will be represented by his favorite chili recipe. And to assure a bipartisan spirit to the day, hummus favored by Governor Mitt Romney will also be served.

 

November 6, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Erica Chenoweth of the University of Denver examines the success rates of both violent and nonviolent resistance movements. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 6, 2012

Record shares of young adults are enrolling in college and completing degrees there, according to a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center. The report, based on newly available U.S. Census data, says that in 2012, one-third of the nation’s 25- to 29-year-olds have completed at least a bachelor’s degree. This is the first time for such a level of educational attainment. Notably, the gains came at a time that the racial and ethnic make-up of the U.S. population was diversifying, a trend that some experts predicted would lead to a decline in educational attainment.

November 5, 2012

The Association of American Medical Colleges plans to launch new leadership training programs to train a new generation of administrators to lead medical education. Darrell G. Kirch, president of the association, announced the effort Sunday during his address at the group's annual meeting. He cited new research on leadership, and said that academic medicine needs to move away from the idea of seeking “one leader with special knowledge to be the 'sage at the top.'" Rather, he said, medical schools need to seek out people who can work to develop a wide base of talent at their institutions.

November 5, 2012

The American Studies Crossroads Project, an early web pioneer that enabled instructors to share online teaching materials and stories of how they had used them, has been archived and closed -- made irrelevant, its founder says, by the "swiftly moving stream that is the Internet." Randy Bass, a professor of English and associate provost at Georgetown University, said that its core idea -- being "a single knowledge-building, field-forming virtual community" for scholars and teachers in American studies -- "no longer has a role in the distributed and ubiquitous environment of the Web."

November 5, 2012

California's community colleges have been ordered to focus on students who can earn degrees or certificates or who can transfer to four-year institutions, and to de-emphasize other programs. An article in The Los Angeles Times explores the impact of this directive on rural community colleges. At those institutions, the Times reported, the identity of the colleges is much more centered on long-term ties to community members and the colleges have played a much broader cultural and social role than those in urban areas. As a result, many are questioning the appropriateness of the new approach for such colleges.

 

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