Higher Education Quick Takes

Quick Takes

November 8, 2012

The University of Waterloo will close its campus in Dubai because of inadequate enrollment and an inability to form partnerships for research, The Record of Waterloo reported. Waterloo opened its campus in the United Arab Emirates three years ago, with ambitions to enroll 500 students by this fall. But a statement from the university Tuesday said that the 80 students enrolled on the Dubai campus could finish their educations on the university's home campus in Ontario.

November 8, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Claire Fraser of the University of Maryland explains the growing understanding of how microbes influence overall human health. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

November 7, 2012

About 350 students at Fairfield University were displaced by Hurricane Sandy, and the university is relocating them with friends, with local volunteers and others. Four students have an unusual new home, The Connecticut Post reported. President Jeffrey von Arx opened his home, and they have moved in.

November 7, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Erica van de Waal of the University of St. Andrews reveals the important role mothers play in learning among groups of vervet monkeys. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 7, 2012

A former dean at St. John’s University accused of stealing more than $1 million from the institution and forcing international students to perform personal chores as a condition of their scholarships was found dead on Tuesday; police are investigating her death as a suicide, The New York Times reported. Cecilia Chang was midway through her trial at the federal court in Brooklyn, where she took the stand on Monday. As St. John’s vice president for international relations and dean of the Institute of Asian Studies, Chang allegedly charged hundreds of thousands of dollars of personal expenses to a university credit card, and forced international students to clean her house and hand-wash her underwear, among other chores. Chang faced up to 20 years in prison.

November 7, 2012

The University of California at Berkeley announced Tuesday that it has created 100 endowed chairs by matching a $113 million grant from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The grant was made amid concern that Berkeley risked losing star faculty members to private institutions in an era when the state could not be counted on to support faculty salaries. By endowing the chairs, the university hopes to hold on to and attract top faculty talent, which in turn is expected to attract top graduate students.

 

November 6, 2012

Smith College will mark Election Day (and remind students to vote) by serving food items associated with presidents. On the menu today: New England clam chowder (a favorite of President Kennedy), mini ballpark franks (inspired by the time President Franklin D. Roosevelt served them to British royalty), and jelly beans (President Reagan's favorite snack). President Obama will be represented by his favorite chili recipe. And to assure a bipartisan spirit to the day, hummus favored by Governor Mitt Romney will also be served.

 

November 6, 2012

In today’s Academic Minute, Erica Chenoweth of the University of Denver examines the success rates of both violent and nonviolent resistance movements. Learn more about the Academic Minute here.

 

November 6, 2012

Record shares of young adults are enrolling in college and completing degrees there, according to a report released Monday by the Pew Research Center. The report, based on newly available U.S. Census data, says that in 2012, one-third of the nation’s 25- to 29-year-olds have completed at least a bachelor’s degree. This is the first time for such a level of educational attainment. Notably, the gains came at a time that the racial and ethnic make-up of the U.S. population was diversifying, a trend that some experts predicted would lead to a decline in educational attainment.

November 6, 2012

The House Education and the Workforce committee has asked the Government Accountability Office to investigate servicing issues in the Direct Loan program, including the performance of loans under both direct lending and federally guaranteed lending and servicing problems that some borrowers are reportedly experiencing. The Education Department's system has had gaps and errors since it began issuing all student loans in 2010, including servicing problems that left some students unable to rehabilitate defaulted loans. House Republicans, who opposed the switch to direct lending, said the recent complaints were "troubling."

Tiffany Edwards, a spokeswoman for the committee's Democrats, said the program "should be held to a high standard and be working in the best interest of students," comparing direct lending favorably to the former bank-based lending program.

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